Monthly Archives: July 2012

Daffodil Cavaliers

The cavalry of the American Civil War are well known for their dashing appearance. During the 1860s, the horse Soldiers from both sides strove to adopt and emulate the appearance of the Cavaliers of Europe and of the American Revolution. … Continue reading

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Warren’s Legacy still asks urgent questions

As a Kentucky-born writer who lived most of his professional life in the North, Robert Penn Warren was deeply conflicted about the American Civil War. That ambivalence, and the tensions that sprang from it, haunt every section of his essential … Continue reading

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A beautiful, despairing journey with a coal-black horse

There’s a kind of myth-making happening in Robert Olmstead’s novel Coal Black Horse. Published in 2007, I had the chance this past week to journey with the horse once more, and it was a trip well worth taking. Set in … Continue reading

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Indiana Soldiers & Sailors Memorial

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A March Through War

This week I was privileged to attend a Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History seminar at Yale University. The topic is “Everyday Life in Early America” which included a fieldtrip to Historic Deerfield, in Massachusetts. Deerfield–rich with history going back … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Monuments, Preservation, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

A visit with “Old Kinderhook” on the 150th anniversary of his death

The secession of South Carolina triggered civil war in Martin Van Buren’s house before it ever triggered fighting on the battlefield. After his public career ended, the former president had retired to the quiet life of a country farmer in … Continue reading

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The Grand Austin Flour Sack: An Idea Whose Time May Come Again!

For me, this summer’s reading included Mark Twain’s Roughing It, a compelling account of California and Nevada during the time of the Civil War by a man who did not fight. Legend has it that young Sam Clemens, after a … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Economics, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Ties to the War | 2 Comments

Civil War Sketch Book: Drawings from the Battlefront by Harry Katz and Vincent Virga

As a coffee table book, Civil War Sketch Book: Drawings from the Battlefront is beautiful. As a repository of some of the best Civil War artwork done by the “Special Artists” of New York’s Harper’s and Illustrated News, it is invaluable. … Continue reading

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Abe says, “Hey”

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Unholy Sabbath

Unholy Sabbath: The Battle of South Mountain in History and Memory, September 14, 1862 by Brian Matthew Jordan Savas Beatie, 2012. Pp. XI, 388. ISBN 978-1-61121-088-0. Hardcover $32.95. On September 14, 1862, the Union Army of the Potomac defeated the Confederate … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Monuments, Preservation | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments