Gettysburg Off the Beaten Path: Jones’ Wall

Jones' wall along East Confederate Ave.

Jones’ wall along East Confederate Ave.

A half mile down East Confederate Ave., on a sharp bend in the road, runs a low stone wall. With so many stone walls running across the battlefield, this one, like so many others, simply blends into the countryside. This wall should not be overlooked, though, for it is one of the few that was actually built by soldiers who participated in the battle.

This wall was constructed by the men of Brigadier General John M. Jones Brigade. Jones, known as “Rum Jones,” due to his heavy drinking habit, led his six regiment brigade of Virginians against the steepest part of Culp’s Hill, only to be thwarted by George Greene’s New York Brigade. Wounded early in the fight, Jones was forced from the field. When his men fell back to this position, they constructed this fortification to aid in defense of their position, should Greene’s men counterattack.

To reach this position from the square: Take York Street two blocks to Liberty Street and turn right. Follow Liberty Street until it turns into East Confederate Ave. Once you enter the park, it is a half mile to the wall, which will be visible out your left window. I suggest driving around the corner and parking next to the Nicholl’s Brigade monument on the left hand side of the road, then walk back to the wall.

Authors Note: Notice how the wall is smoothly sloped on the side facing the enemy.

Jones Wall Map

About Kristopher D White

Civil War historian.
This entry was posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Gettysburg Off the Beaten Path: Jones’ Wall

  1. I just drove by there today. Culp’s Hill is generally overlooked as it is, but that road that winds down around the front of it seems to always get forgotten about–but it provides an amazingly disheartening perspective of the Confederate approach. Definitely worth a visit.

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