Author Archives: Meg Thompson

About Meg Thompson

CW Historian

Creamer, Please. No Sugar

I had an idea the other day, and acted on it! I sort of made a “coffee run,” if you will . . . ——- Starbucks Customer Service / PO Box 6363 / Dover, DE 19905-6363 Meg Thompson / Hollister, CA 95023 / July … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Economics, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Personalities, Preservation, Sesquicentennial, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Today is the Day

July 17, 1864. Davis had had it. He had given Confederate Joseph E. Johnston every chance possible. He had sent General Braxton Bragg down to Atlanta to personally check out the situation of the Army of Tennessee, he had thought … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

A Matter of Opinion

In researching and writing for this blog, I have had much help from friends. One is Mr. Steve Splittgerber, who takes wonderful photographs. He sent a couple of images my way from the Frankfort Cemetery, in Frankfort, Kentucky. I am … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Monuments, Ties to the War | 1 Comment

General Lee Makes a Joke

The North Carolina Exploring Cultural Heritage Online site (NC ECHO) send some interesting things my way once in a while. This arrived yesterday: it is from the Greensboro Patriot, June 23, 1864, and is apparently reprinted from the Richmond Sentinel, … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Newspapers, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Little Poetry

Sometimes in the middle of all the carnage, a little poetry helps to clear one’s vision. After all, the American Civil War was about some pretty defining things, a few of which are still undergoing examination.

Posted in Books & Authors, Civilian, Memory, Personalities, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“Winnie Davis: Daughter of the Lost Cause” by Heath Hardage Lee

Varina Anne Davis, called “Winnie,” was born in the Confederate White House in June, 1864. She instantly became the symbol of hope for the entire Confederate nation. Author and southern women’s history writer Heath Hardage Lee, also born in Richmond, has … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

REMEMBER ELLSWORTH!

At this point in the sesquicentennial celebration of the American Civil War–mid-1864– historians and buffs are thinking about casualty numbers in the hundreds of thousands, often tens of thousands per battle. Was Union General Ulysses S. Grant a butcher to … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Holidays, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Death of a Hero

I wonder if I could ever convey to another–to you, for instance, Reader dear–the tender and terrible realities of such cases, (many, many happen’d,) as the one I am now going to mention……..Stewart C. Glover, Co. E., Fifth Wisconsin–was wounded, … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Medical, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Every Free, Able-bodied White Male Citizen: Two Examples of Militia Readiness in Antebellum America Part III                    

Also in 1859, young Elmer Ellsworth became captain of a moribund militia company, the National Guard Cadets of Chicago, Illinois. Ellsworth had developed a statewide reputation as a drillmaster, and agreed to take on the challenge of rebuilding this group … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Common Soldier, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Every Free, Able-bodied White Male Citizen: Two Examples of Militia readiness in Antebellum America Part II

Volunteer militias became popular in all areas of the country, but only two will be considered here: the Black Horse Cavalry from Fauquier County, Virginia, and the U. S. Zouave Cadets, from Chicago, Illinois. These militia companies each had a … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Battles, Civilian, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments