Category Archives: Politics

ECW Weekender: In the Footsteps of Nullification with John C. Calhoun

Many historians have traced the roots of the Civil War back to the Nullification Crisis of 1832, triggered by South Carolina’s Ordinance of Nullification. The ordinance contended that a state had a right to ignore a Federal law if it … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Battlefields & Historic Places, ECW Weekender, Leadership--Confederate, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Today is the Day

July 17, 1864. Davis had had it. He had given Confederate Joseph E. Johnston every chance possible. He had sent General Braxton Bragg down to Atlanta to personally check out the situation of the Army of Tennessee, he had thought … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

John Tyler: The Brief Civil War Career of Virginia’s Elder Statesman

The grave of James Monroe sits in a cage on the crown of a knoll in Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery. The ornate metalwork that holds him in looks like an oversized birdcage, although whether it’s to keep grave robbers from plundering Monroe’s sarcophagus … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The Presidents’ War

I’ve been spending time with an interesting and highly readable book by Chris DeRose called The Presidents’ War: Six American Presidents and the Civil War that Divided Them. These days, former presidents tend to keep their noses out of the … Continue reading

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Wade Hampton in Charleston

I’ve just returned from a week in Charleston, South Carolina, where my wife and I spent out honeymoon. It’s tough to vacation in the Cradle of Secession without wanting to totally geek-out on Civil War history—yet I promised Jenny I’d … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

War on the 4th

On the fourth day of July, Americans join together in a celebration of Independence. We show our pride by sporting red, white, and blue, launching fireworks, and firing up the grill. During the years 1861-1865, four Independence Days passed by … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

A Little Poetry

Sometimes in the middle of all the carnage, a little poetry helps to clear one’s vision. After all, the American Civil War was about some pretty defining things, a few of which are still undergoing examination.

Posted in Books & Authors, Civilian, Memory, Personalities, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Trading With the Enemy

Today we are happy to welcome back guest author Philip Leigh.  On June 7, 1863, the day before Robert E. Lee attended a cavalry review prior to his second Northern invasion that would culminate early the following month at Gettysburg, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

REMEMBER ELLSWORTH!

At this point in the sesquicentennial celebration of the American Civil War–mid-1864– historians and buffs are thinking about casualty numbers in the hundreds of thousands, often tens of thousands per battle. Was Union General Ulysses S. Grant a butcher to … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Holidays, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Brooklyn in Charleston

Today we are happy to welcome back guest author Philip Leigh.  “The only way to win a war is to prevent it.” – General George Marshall Within Civil War public memory many wrongly assume the first shots were those forcing … Continue reading

Posted in Navies, Politics, Sieges | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments