Category Archives: Holidays

Breakthrough at Petersburg: “April Fool, Johnnies!”

After the thrilling Union victory at Five Forks on April 1, Lt. Col. Horace Porter raced back with a report to Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s headquarters near Dabney’s Mill. He swiftly picked his way through the mess behind the … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Common Soldier, Holidays, Sesquicentennial, Sieges | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Queen of Delphine, Part II

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author Dwight Hughes. New Year’s Day continued clear and balmy; all sails were set with just enough breeze to fill them, the first really fine weather they had experienced since entering the … Continue reading

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Question of the Week: January 26, 2015

I’m sure I’m not the only person who got the Civil War Sesquicentennial tumbler set for Christmas. The set contains glasses with four Confederates (Davis, Lee, Jackson, and Stuart) and four Federals (Lincoln, Grant, Sherman, and McClellan). 

Posted in Holidays, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 15 Comments

Stonewall’s Birthday

I hear the sound of furniture sliding across the living room carpet, but it stops in time for my daughter to hear my footsteps coming down the hallway from the kitchen. “Don’t come in yet!” Steph pleads. “What are you … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Question of the Week: January 19, 2015

This week’s question actually comes from ECW’s business officer, Jennifer Mackowski. Pondering some of the discussions and controversies that have swirled around Virginia this past weekend in relation to Lee-Jackson Day and Martin Luther King, Jr., Day, she asks: What … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory, Question of the Week, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

“…please furnish better mules…”— JEB Stuart’s 1862 Christmas Raid, Part Two

This is part two of a two-part series on Jeb Stuart’s 1862 Christmas Raid; part one was posted on December 26th. Stuart’s Christmas Raid, by John Paul Strain  After sending his famous message to Gen. Meigs, Stuart decided to confuse … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battlefields & Historic Places, Campaigns, Cavalry, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“…please furnish better mules…”— JEB Stuart’s 1862 Christmas Raid, Part One

This is the first of a two-part series on Jeb Stuart’s 1862 Christmas Raid. After the Battle of Fredericksburg, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia settled in the area south of the Rappahannock River near Fredericksburg. On Christmas day, Gen. … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Cavalry, Civil War Events, Holidays, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The ECW Year in Review

Merry Christmas from all of us at Emerging Civil War!

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Year in Review | Tagged | 4 Comments

Christmas in Savannah: A Letter from Major Henry Hitchcock

On Christmas Eve, 1864, Major Henry Hitchcock, an officer serving on Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman’s staff, took a moment late in the evening to begin writing a letter home to his family. Hitchcock  did not finish it until a few days later, as … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Holidays, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Christmas 1864: Reminiscence at the Confederate White House

The Christmas of 1864 was a grim holiday season for the Confederacy, with Nashville, Atlanta, and Savannah under Union control, Southern railroads destroyed, and the Confederate army retreating. Sherman’s March to the Sea left Georgia residents with little to be … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory | Tagged | 2 Comments