Category Archives: Medical

Mary Anne Bickerdyke or Martha Stewart?

The book I am reading is Civil War Medicine: Care & Comfort of the Wounded, by Robert E. Denney. Denny is a pretty interesting read, interspersing letters and official correspondence with a running commentary of the war. He is also … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Books & Authors, Campaigns, Civilian, Common Soldier, Holidays, Leadership--Federal, Medical, Memory, Personalities, Symposium, Ties to the War, Upcoming Events, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Staff Work 101

George Patton famously said that “an army is a team.” Often, this statement is taken in terms of commanders and units working together, but there is another essential element that makes an army (or any headquarters) work: the command staff.

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battles, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Medical, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

For Want of Safe Evacuation

While working on my thesis recently, I was reading Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac by Dr. Letterman. He offered a brief note about the wounding of Stonewall Jackson at the battle of Chancellorsville:

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Symposium Preview: Meg Thompson and “The Legacy of Caring”

By ECW Correspondent Liam McGurl Emerging Civil War will hold its second symposium August 7-9 at Stevenson Ridge.  In honor of the event, six guest speakers are scheduled to address topics relating to this year’s theme, “Civil War Legacies.” One … Continue reading

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William Child at Ford’s Theater

Northerners across the country had reason to celebrate in mid-April 1865.  The war had ended in a Union victory, with the Union restored and the emancipation of millions of African Americans from bondage.  As celebrations in the forms of speeches, … Continue reading

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William Child in Washington

When 1865 brought forth another year of the war and the Army of the Potomac still occupied its miles of trenches at the front around Petersburg, William Child, surgeon of the 5th New Hampshire Infantry was a man of mixed … Continue reading

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Lincoln’s Last Day at the Front

Abraham Lincoln fittingly spent the tail end of the Petersburg Campaign at the front, docked in the River Queen offshore from the Federal headquarters at City Point. He met with important generals to discuss strategy, reviewed Union troops and their Confederate … Continue reading

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“What If Jackson had Survived His Wounding?”

I get the question all the time: “What if Stonewall Jackson hadn’t been shot?” When people ask that question, what they really want to know is “What would he have done at Gettysburg?” My answer is always “He would have … Continue reading

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William Child in 1865

A new year was well underway in the Army of the Potomac’s camps outside of Petersburg, Virginia when William Child, Surgeon of the 5th New Hampshire wrote to his wife Carrie. He had last written her a week earlier. In … Continue reading

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John Bell Hood: Dope Fiend?

The American Civil War, it seems, is awash in stories that “everyone” knows to be true. We accept them as fact because they either make for a great story, or they ring so true to life, that it seems natural … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Medical, Memory, Personalities, Sesquicentennial, Western Theater | 11 Comments