Category Archives: Medical

“We Must Strike Them a Blow!”—Robert E. Lee at North Anna (part three)

part three of three That night, as time slipped by for the Army of Northern Virginia to attack Hancock’s portion of the Army of the Potomac, Lee’s demeanor worsened. Because of his dysentery, his immobility, his lack of sleep, his … Continue reading

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“We Must Strike Them a Blow!”—Robert E. Lee at North Anna (part two)

part two of three The Confederate line along the North Anna was one of the strongest the Army of Northern Virginia held during the war. Laid out by engineers, the line was an inverted “V” positioned along the heights of … Continue reading

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“We Must Strike Them a Blow!”—Robert E. Lee at North Anna (part one)

Part one of three Much is written on Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s health throughout the Civil War. Possible heart attacks, strokes and fatigue began to take a toll on Lee’s health during the war. Most physicians agree today that … Continue reading

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“Death of a Bangor Boy”—The Casualties of Harris Farm

The May 30, 1864, edition of the Bangor (ME) Whig & Courier included a notice titled “Death of a Bangor Boy”—a sixty-four-word obituary for Corporal Charles W. Smith of the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery, Company D, who “died of a … Continue reading

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Death of a Hero

I wonder if I could ever convey to another–to you, for instance, Reader dear–the tender and terrible realities of such cases, (many, many happen’d,) as the one I am now going to mention……..Stewart C. Glover, Co. E., Fifth Wisconsin–was wounded, … Continue reading

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A Leg for Anse to Walk On

Despite all the horrors of Civil War combat, many soldiers feared a visit to a place even more loathsome than the battlefront—the field hospital. Given adequate time, a skilled doctor could perform complicated surgery to extract bullets or repair damage, but … Continue reading

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General Turned Chemist

Another installment of the series “Tales from the Tombstone”  Born in Fredericksburg, Virginia on September 8, 1829, Seth Maxwell Barton had one of the unique post-Civil War careers out of any of the former Confederate general officers. He became a noted … Continue reading

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Top 15 Posts of 2013—Number 3: Civil War Nurses Series: Interesting Facts about Northern Nurses

One great misconception many people have regarding nurses in both the Union and Confederacy is that they assisted the surgeons in medical procedures. This was for the most part not the case, except in rare situations in the field. During … Continue reading

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The Nurse: Women Nurses in the Civil War, part four

Part four in a series The definition of “nurse” in John Daly’s Professional Nursing: Concepts, Issues and Challenges is “Nursing is a societally mandated, socially constructed practice profession existing to serve a public that has certain expectations of nurses and … Continue reading

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Dealing with Death—Women Nurses in the Civil War, part three

part three in a series Handbook of Death and Dying, Volume 1 as well as in both of Drew Gilpin Faust’s works regarding death during the Civil War explains that antebellum American culture was preoccupied with death – both in … Continue reading

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