Category Archives: Memory

Booth’s Escape Route (conclusion)

By ECW Correspondent Pat Tintle. In the days following the president’s assassination, while American citizens mourned the death of their leader, Union troops searched surrounding rural areas for Booth. In the morning following Lincoln’s death, Union troops set up headquarters … Continue reading

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The East Room / April 20, 1865, 3:00 AM

It was only a still night if the weather was what counted. The White House, draped inside and out with mourning, was surrounded by military guards, and citizens who ranged from morbidly curious to brokenhearted.

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Patriotic Booth? “Misguided…Ignorant”

ECW is pleased to offer a guest commentary from historian and SCV member Chuck Young. April 14, 2015 marked the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. While thousands of Americans marked this occasion … Continue reading

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Booth’s Escape Route

By ECW Correspondent Pat Tintle. Spring was in the air in Washington D.C., but the time of rebirth would soon be tarnished by a nation-wide state of mourning. It was April 14, 1865. The war of the rebellion was winding … Continue reading

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O Captain! My Captain!

There are many excellent reasons why Walt Whitman is considered the poet laureate of the American Civil War. His poetic style is much closer to that of the 20th century’s free verse rather than the labored rhyme schemes so popular … Continue reading

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Mourning Keepsakes

Mourning jewelry and other similar keepsakes became popular objects created and worn to honor a loved one or a person of importance. Queen Victoria unknowingly propagated the trend upon the death of her husband, Prince Albert, in 1861. In the … Continue reading

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James A. Garfield Remembers Abraham Lincoln

 On April 14, 1866, Ohio Representative James A. Garfield stood and used the occasion of the first anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination to eulogize the late president. Though he had only been in office little more than three years, Garfield’s eulogy … Continue reading

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Reactions to Lincoln’s Death

Six days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln while at Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC.  Almost immediately, a word of mouth network began diffusing throughout the city. As news … Continue reading

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Where Was George Gordon Meade?

A Google search of the many sketches and paintings that have become the iconic, popular images of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House may unveil a startling revelation. The commander of the Army of the Potomac, the principle … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Appomattox (of a sorts) in Massachusetts

One place I was surprised to find to run into Lee and Grant was in Lowell, Massachusetts. There, their meeting at Appomattox is frozen in time in the main room of the city library, courtesy of artist Paul Philippoteaux, the man … Continue reading

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