Tag Archives: Lincoln Assassination

On Location: Charlotte, NC

One of the most oddball monuments I’ve ever seen is in Charlotte, North Carolina, embedded in the sidewalk. Last summer, I finally went On Location to seek it out: the spot where Jefferson Davis heard the news about Lincoln’s assassination. Check … Continue reading

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Book Review: “Shooting Lincoln: Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and the Race to Photograph the Story of the Century”

Across the street from Ford’s Theatre and next to the Petersen House in Washington, D.C. there’s a museum dedicated to Abraham Lincoln’s legacy. The centerpiece of that museum is a three-and-a-half story tower of books written about the 16th president … Continue reading

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The Mummy Currently Known as “John” or How John Wilkes Booth Went On To a Second Career

Hallowe’en is certainly the time for one to ponder the unknown. It had never occurred to me that John Wilkes Booth would fit into this category, but once again . . . I was wrong. Most people agree on an … Continue reading

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Remembering the Flag Raising Over Fort Sumter

By Julie Mujic Residents of Waukesha, Wisconsin, celebrated Lee’s surrender on the evening of April 9, 1865, along with the rest of the North. The long war was ending and their loved ones might finally return home. Despite their distance from … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Memory, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Booth’s Escape Route (conclusion)

By ECW Correspondent Pat Tintle. In the days following the president’s assassination, while American citizens mourned the death of their leader, Union troops searched surrounding rural areas for Booth. In the morning following Lincoln’s death, Union troops set up headquarters … Continue reading

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Patriotic Booth? “Misguided…Ignorant”

ECW is pleased to offer a guest commentary from historian and SCV member Chuck Young. April 14, 2015 marked the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. While thousands of Americans marked this occasion … Continue reading

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Booth’s Escape Route

By ECW Correspondent Pat Tintle. Spring was in the air in Washington D.C., but the time of rebirth would soon be tarnished by a nation-wide state of mourning. It was April 14, 1865. The war of the rebellion was winding … Continue reading

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Reactions to Lincoln’s Death

Six days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln while at Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC.  Almost immediately, a word of mouth network began diffusing throughout the city. As news … Continue reading

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William Child at Ford’s Theater

Northerners across the country had reason to celebrate in mid-April 1865.  The war had ended in a Union victory, with the Union restored and the emancipation of millions of African Americans from bondage.  As celebrations in the forms of speeches, … Continue reading

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William Child in Washington

When 1865 brought forth another year of the war and the Army of the Potomac still occupied its miles of trenches at the front around Petersburg, William Child, surgeon of the 5th New Hampshire Infantry was a man of mixed … Continue reading

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