Tag Archives: Race-and-Reunion-series

Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: Restoring Reunion (Anew)

Final part in a series The contributions of David Blight’s Race and Reunion to the scholarship on Reconstruction and historical memory are undeniably some of the most valuable (and most-cited) in contemporary historiography on the American Civil War. Perhaps more … Continue reading

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Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: The PR Battles for Public Opinion and Memory

Part three in a series As a communications professor and former public relations guy, it’s hard for me to look at memory studies as anything but public relations cases. After all, public memory starts as public opinion, and public opinion … Continue reading

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Race & Reunion 10 Years Later: The Power of Interpretation and Explanation

Part two in a series Authored by James Broomall.   In thinking about David Blight’s sweeping study, Race and Reunion, I am drawn to its interpretive and explanatory powers, especially as a teaching instrument. In describing how Americans’ “remembered their … Continue reading

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Race and Reunion 10 Years Later: “Reconciliationist” Memory Trumps “Emancipationist” Memory

Part one in a series With a decade of perspective on which to draw, it’s clear that David Blight’s Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (2001) represented both a culmination of and shift within Civil War memory … Continue reading

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ECW Explores the Legacy of David Blight’s Race and Reunion

Prologue to a series Ten years ago, scholar David Blight published Race & Reunion, a game-changing book that challenged the way the Civil War has been remembered. Blight contended that competing memories warred with each other in the decades that … Continue reading

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