Author Archives: Meg Groeling

About Meg Groeling

CW Historian

Weekly Whitman: “Drum-Taps”

The poem for which Whitman’s book of war poems, Drum-Taps, is named, reminds us that Whitman himself was forty-two when the Civil War broke out. He lived with his mother in Brooklyn, supporting them both with the money he made … Continue reading

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Every Free Able-Bodied Male Citizen: Another Example of Militia Readiness in Antebellum America Part IV

A few years ago, I wrote a series concerning antebellum militias in America. I gave a thoughtful introduction, explaining the state of local militias between the Revolution and the Civil War, then wrote about a northern militia group and a … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Dirge for Two Veterans”

Last week ECW published a valentine created from the last stanza of the poem “Dirge for Two Veterans.” It is only right that we look at the poem itself. The fading twilight that begins the poem is a metaphor for … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: Happy Valentine’s Day

Happy Valentine’s Day! Here is a valentine card from your Uncle Walt, ready for printing and giving to all those near and dear—or not. The excerpt is from Whitman’s poem, “Dirge for Two Veterans,” which will be featured next Sunday. … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: An Army Corps on the March

In 1865 Whitman engaged New York publisher Peter Eckler to print the first issue of Drum-Taps. After President Lincoln’s death, Whitman chose to stop printing efforts and wait for some time to pass. In the autumn of 1865 he added … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: City of Ships

Walt Whitman was always the New Yorker, and in this poem Whitman returns to his beloved city, where so much of the world’s diversity comes together as one. As simple as a harbor of ships seems, the poet helps us … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “The Dresser”

Just what did Walt Whitman do in the hospitals where he worked? He was a wound dresser. The duties of the wound dresser—always a man, unless the emergency was dire—were to change bandages, hydrate wounds or operation sites, turn patients … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Medical, Personalities | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Weekly Whitman: An Earlier Inauguration

Walt Whitman covered the 1864 presidential inauguration of Abraham Lincoln for The New York Times. His language is poetic rather than political, and no one is sure if he could even hear the speech. The text of the speech was … Continue reading

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Book Review: Wisconsin at Antietam: The Badger State’s Sacrifice on America’s Bloodiest Day

Sometimes you just need everything in one place–background, analysis, good quotes, orders of battle, pertinent illustrations, some politics, maps, context, chapter notes, and an easy-to-use-index. From cover to cover, this little gem–Cal Schoonover’s Wisconsin at Antietam: The Badger State’s Sacrifice on … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: The Sounds of Winter

Union and Confederate soldiers spent three winters in service during the years 1861-65. Whether it was winter merriment in New Orleans or, more commonly, bivouacked among the snowdrifts of the South, it was cold and strange for men who had … Continue reading

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