Author Archives: Lee White

Crutchfield’s Last Stand at Sailor’s Creek

The column that made up Gen. Richard Ewell’s Reserve Corps of Richmond defenders was a colorful lot: the veterans of Gen. Joseph Kershaw’s division (formerly McLaws’); the sailors and marines of Capt. John Tucker’s Naval Battalion; and Col. Stapleton Crutchfield’s … Continue reading

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The Flag of the 10th S.C.

When their charge went too deep, the men of Coltart’s Division found themselves almost surrounded. In the ensuing chaos, the remaining men of the 10th South Carolina found themselves in great peril. One soldier ticked off the results:

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The Last Charge of the Army of Tennessee

As the line of gaunt and scared Confederate veterans emerged from the piney forest and advanced over the cool, sandy soil, the scene inspired nearby onlookers. The Army of Tennessee was moving forward that afternoon for an assault once more. … Continue reading

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Battle of the Cedars, 150 Years Ago

There was no rest for the weary after the slaughter at Franklin. Gen. Hood ordered most of his army to continue their pursuit of Schofield’s forces to Nashville. Along the way, on December 2, Gen. William Bate received the following … Continue reading

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The Joy and Sadness of Archibald Gracie

Brigadier General Archibald Gracie was an unlikely Confederate general: a New Yorker by birth and pedigree. Gracie’s family was prominent in New York City from the Colonial era on. Gracie received his education at West Point, graduating in 1854. His … Continue reading

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Franklin 150th: Artillery Hell

One of the things often remembered about Gen. John Bell Hood’s attack is that it was made without artillery support. Like many of the aspects of Franklin, this isn’t entirely true. In fact, there were a few batteries present, one … Continue reading

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Franklin 150th: To Die Like Men

It had all led to this: Major General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne, known as the “Stonewall of the West,” galloped up to his brigade commanders assembled on top of Breezy Hill, just south of the little town of Franklin, Tennessee. “He … Continue reading

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Franklin 150th: The Last Thing He Ever Saw….

William Decatur Mintz, known as Dee, was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, to a respectable farming family, but like many young me, he saw opportunity on the frontier. Dee ended up in Little Rock, Arkansas, when the Secession Crisis … Continue reading

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The Madden Creek Massacre, 150 years ago today

One hundred and fifty years ago today, a small incident occurred in the mountains of southeast Tennessee that became known as the Madden Creek Massacre. The incident served as an example of Sherman’s maxim that “War is Hell” and typified the … Continue reading

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Hood Remembered: Lee White

I think Hood should be remembered as a talented brigade and division commander, one who inspired his men and one who didn’t ask them to do something he himself would not do. He was brave to a fault and a … Continue reading

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