Author Archives: SeanMichaelChick

“But his soul goes marching on.” Brown, Douglass, and the Radicals

Today abolitionism is praised with few reservations, but it was a fringe movement in the 1830s. Its followers took a lonely moral stand. William Lloyd Garrison in 1831 declared “I am in earnest. I will not equivocate – I will … Continue reading

Posted in Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 21 Comments

Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Sean Michael Chick

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. Asking if the … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Almost a General: James de Berty Trudeau

The Trudeau family was among the prominent old families of New Orleans. They provided soldiers and administrators to the French and Spanish rulers of Louisiana. The first was Jean Trudeau, a French Canadian, confidant of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, … Continue reading

Posted in Artillery | 3 Comments

Yellow Fever and Reconciliation

Among the historical memories that still haunt New Orleans are those of the Yellow Fever outbreaks of the 1800s. As a descendant of Irishmen, who suffered disproportionately from the disease, I heard my grandmother speak of the last few outbreaks … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Medical, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Musings on Arthur Fremantle’s “Three Months in the Southern States”

When historians look at a primary source, it is often to cut and run. You go to the part of the source that deals with your subject and that is it. In the case of Arthur Fremantle’s Three Months in … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Campaigns | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Captain Emile Locoul and the Defense of St. James Parrish

Emile Locoul was a third generation Louisiana plantation owner. He was considered a Creole, which in Louisiana meant a person’s whose ancestors came when Louisiana was a colony and who maintained the colonial traditions. Most Creoles were of French, Spanish, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Interview with David Knox

During an August 2018 visit to the Ogden Museum of Southern Art (located next door to New Orleans’ Civil War Museum at Confederate Memorial Hall) I encountered the work of David Knox. He takes photos from the Civil War to … Continue reading

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Shiloh and Private Samuel Chick

In studying up on my family’s genealogy in 2017 I found ancestors who fought both North and South. They are mostly cousins. I am the direct descendant of Private Samuel Chick of Company E of the 44th Tennessee. The regiment … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Common Soldier, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

The Rise and Fall of W. Irving Hodgson

The most famed artillery unit of the American Civil War was New Orleans’ Washington Artillery. Founded in 1838, they had taken part in the Mexican-American War but did not see combat. Founded as a strictly Anglo-American outfit, by the 1850s … Continue reading

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Shiloh: Preston Pond’s Charge at Tilghman Branch

Among the largest brigades to fight at Shiloh was Colonel Preston Pond’s outfit, mostly made up of Louisiana troops. It numbered around 2,600 men. 1,400 of these were in two regiments, the 38th Tennessee and the Crescent Regiment, a militia … Continue reading

Posted in Battles | Tagged , , | 8 Comments