Author Archives: Sean Michael Chick

Surprise at Shiloh

The western battles of 1862 included three surprise attacks, although only one was planned as such. The opening Confederate attacks at Fort Donelson and Stones River caught the Union forces unprepared. Yet, neither caused a scandal, likely because both battles … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Emerging Civil War | 9 Comments

Drewry’s Bluff: Victory Without Satisfaction

Few campaigns in the American Civil War seemed to hold as much potential as Benjamin Butler’s Bermuda Hundred landings. Butler was expected to threaten and if possible capture Richmond, the long sought brass ring in the Eastern Theater. He could … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Campaigns | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Civil War & Pop Culture: “Like I said, the war was rough through here.” Thoughts on the film Pharaoh’s Army

Before 2012’s Lincoln, I used to say the big three Civil War movies were Gone with the Wind (1939), Glory (1989), and Gettysburg (1993), or the three Gs (Birth of a Nation is important for history and the evolution of … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments

CW & Pop Culture: Robert E. Lee and The Guns of the South: 1992 vs. 2019

In the 1990s it was common enough at my New Orleans high school to see copies of Harry Turtledove’s The Guns of the South. It offered a beguiling and humorous image of Robert E. Lee in his classic pose, only … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Civil War in Pop Culture | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

Forgetting Nashville

Among the twenty-five bloodiest battles of the American Civil War, Nashville—fought December 15-16, 1864—stands as among the most “forgotten.” Only two major works, by Stanley F. Horn and James Lee McDonough, have chronicled the engagement. The reasons for this are … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Memory | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

“But his soul goes marching on.” Brown, Douglass, and the Radicals

Today abolitionism is praised with few reservations, but it was a fringe movement in the 1830s. Its followers took a lonely moral stand. William Lloyd Garrison in 1831 declared “I am in earnest. I will not equivocate – I will … Continue reading

Posted in Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 21 Comments

Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Sean Michael Chick

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. Asking if the … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Almost a General: James de Berty Trudeau

The Trudeau family was among the prominent old families of New Orleans. They provided soldiers and administrators to the French and Spanish rulers of Louisiana. The first was Jean Trudeau, a French Canadian, confidant of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, … Continue reading

Posted in Artillery | 3 Comments

Yellow Fever and Reconciliation

Among the historical memories that still haunt New Orleans are those of the Yellow Fever outbreaks of the 1800s. As a descendant of Irishmen, who suffered disproportionately from the disease, I heard my grandmother speak of the last few outbreaks … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Medical, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Musings on Arthur Fremantle’s “Three Months in the Southern States”

When historians look at a primary source, it is often to cut and run. You go to the part of the source that deals with your subject and that is it. In the case of Arthur Fremantle’s Three Months in … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Campaigns | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment