Category Archives: Antebellum South

Clay and Calhoun and Their Really Tall Columns

As they were rivals in life, so, too, it seems, did senators Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun try to outrival each other in death—or at least their supporters did. In 2014, as part of a post I wrote about … Continue reading

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“Somebody’s Darling!” . . . And The War Came Home, Part 3

The Civil War affected all of America. The Irish and German families who had sent their sons alone to a land across the Atlantic seeking a better life, the elite planter parents and siblings who bid goodbye to a cherished … Continue reading

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Wah-Who-Eeee! … And The War Came to the Rebels, Part 2

Author Margaret Mitchel wrote her version of the sound of the rebel yell as “Wah-Who-Eeee,” and that was the sound heard throughout the Southern states when Confederate general P. G. T. Beauregard opened his well-prepared cannon on shabby little Fort … Continue reading

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Laure “Doucette” Larendon: Beauregard’s Daughter

Among P.G.T. Beauregard his closest friends was Charles Villeré, son of Jules Villeré, a sugar cane planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member of one of the most prominent Creole families in south Louisiana. Beauregard became smitten with Marie Laure … Continue reading

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Alexander Stephen and the Cornerstone Speech

On March 21, 1861—one hundred and fifty-eight years ago today—Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens was in Savannah, in his home state of Georgia. Seven states had already declared themselves seceded from the Union, and Stephens addressed a large crowd to … Continue reading

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Eating Like A Confederate President: Davis’s Gingerbread

Find Part 1 with details about Lincoln’s Gingerbread here. Gingerbread in all its variations was a big favorite in the north, the south, and in between. Lebkuchen, the German form of gingerbread, was baked in many “Dutch” households, and others … Continue reading

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ECW Weekender: An 18th Century Living History Event at Ellwood Manor

Our colleagues at the Friends of Wilderness Battlefield sent along this great Weekender opportunity for the end of the month. Not only is it an opportunity to visit Ellwood on the Chancellorsville and Wilderness battlefields, but a way to look … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Battlefields & Historic Places, Civil War Trails, Civilian, ECW Weekender, Emerging Civil War, Material Culture, Memory, National Park Service, Preservation, Upcoming Events | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

On Anniversaries and the Timeline of History

The Battle of Gettysburg took place 155 years ago last month. Seems a long time ago, doesn’t it? Seems even further back to the founding of the United States in the 1780s, right? “Dates are the pegs on which we … Continue reading

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Runaway Slave Ad

I took a trip today to the Orange County (VA) Historical Society to do some research on some of the civilians who lived on the Mine Run battlefield. In the archives, I came across the following newspaper ad posted by … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Slavery | 2 Comments

SC’s Secession Convention @ Institute Hall

Over the weekend, I shared photos of some historical markers in Charleston that indicated the location of the building where the state’s postwar constitutional convention met. Ironically, the site of the state’s secession convention was just a block and a … Continue reading

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