Category Archives: Antebellum South

Jefferson Davis vetoes a slave-trade bill

On February 28, 1861, in Montgomery, Alabama, the newly-installed President of the newly-established Confederate States of America contemplated one of the first proposed Confederate laws sent him by the new Congress. Under the bill’s terms, importing black people into the … Continue reading

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The Voyage of the Clotilda – Part 2

See Part 1 The Africans held at the Ouidah barracoons (temporary holding cells for captives slated for sale) that would board the Clotilda came from all walks of life and different tribes. The majority of them were from Yoruba, though … Continue reading

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The Voyage of the Clotilda – Part 1

On December 1, 1806, the 9th Congress assembled to pass an act that would “prohibit the importation of slaves, into any port or place within the jurisdiction of the United States, from and after the first day of January, in … Continue reading

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Sugar Kettle Art

In my many travels to New Orleans, I noticed a peculiar trend in the gardening and landscaping of historic homes. Giant iron kettles or cauldrons were used as fountains or humungous flowerpots. I didn’t think anything of them at first, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Material Culture, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Expanding My Western Horizons with Kevin Waite’s “West of Slavery”

ECW welcomes guest author Patrick Kelly-Fischer We’re currently experiencing a veritable renaissance of scholarship about the Civil War in the West — and one of the most recent, excellent entries is Kevin Waite’s West of Slavery: The Southern Dream of … Continue reading

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Untangling the Marmillions, Part 2

Read Part 1 HERE Naturally, with all these V.B.s, P.B.s, and E.B.s floating around, it makes research difficult, if not impossible to deduct who is who. For instance, a “V.B. Marmillion” was listed along with many other planters in St. … Continue reading

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Untangling the Marmillions, Part 1

On January 30, 1864, Harper’s Weekly published a set of accounts from formerly enslaved blacks from New Orleans. Emancipated by Benjamin Butler during the Federal occupation of the town, these individuals came forward to give their testimonies to the atrocities … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest contributor Adam Burke…[see Part I here] Slavery’s effects on Southern industry and manufacturing devastated the Confederacy’s military manpower capacity. The antebellum North enjoyed dramatic economic and population expansion. From 1840 to 1850, population growth … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part I

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest contributor Adam Burke… Tucked into the nook of a large brick building in historic Harpers Ferry is a conspicuous granite monolith. It stands along Potomac Street, a lesser traveled street one block … Continue reading

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On The Eve Of War: An Englishman in Washington

William Howard Russell, an influential reporter for The Times of London, toured America north and south in 1861-62 leaving a picturesque portrait of places, people, and issues. He is considered one of the first modern war correspondents for dramatic coverage … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Newspapers, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments