Category Archives: Antebellum South

John Brown’s Raid 160th: Conclusion

We’re wrapping up the official series for the 160th of John Brown’s Raid. You’ll probably see a couple more posts in the coming weeks so stay turned! Here’s a review of all the posts in the series.

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A Little Justice Here, Folks! (pt. 1)

On February 6 of this year, I wrote a blog post about Abraham, a formerly enslaved person who was “blown to freedom” at Vicksburg. I found something very compelling about this man. He is young, seems to be relatively healthy, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Civilian, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Personalities, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

Arming Virginia: Henry Wise’s Attempts to Prevent Another John Brown’s Raid

The word of John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry struck the Governor’s Mansion in Richmond, Virginia like a thunderbolt. Immediately, the lanky Henry Wise sprang into action. He called on the state’s militia to help suppress the uprising before journeying … Continue reading

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Governor Wise’s Response To John Brown’s Raid

When violence broke out at Harper’s Ferry, Henry A. Wise was governor of Virginia. In the aftermath of the raid, Virginians were on edge: fears of slave revolt were everywhere and the feeling grew that the Federal Government could not … Continue reading

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Dangerfield Newby and John Brown’s Raid

John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry was planned to be a small beginning to a large outcome. Twenty-one men–twenty-two counting Brown himself–planned to seize the Federal armory and arsenal in the town and ignite a war against slavery that, they … Continue reading

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An Eyewitness Account of John Brown’s Raid

Reverend Michael Costello was the pastor of St. Peter Catholic Church at Harpers Ferry, [West] Virginia during John Brown’s Raid. A native of County Galway, Ireland, Costello studied at All Hallows College in Dublin for the Diocese of Richmond. On … Continue reading

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Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Dwight Hughes

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. The Civil War … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Book Review: Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth

Kevin Levin, a historian, educator, and blogger based in Boston, has waded into this argument keyboard blazing. The first three chapters discuss in depth the definition of a “camp slave.” When a slave-owning family sent one of their men to … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Book Review, Books & Authors, Leadership--Confederate, Monuments, Photography, Primary Sources, Sesquicentennial, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

Captain Emile Locoul and the Defense of St. James Parrish

Emile Locoul was a third generation Louisiana plantation owner. He was considered a Creole, which in Louisiana meant a person’s whose ancestors came when Louisiana was a colony and who maintained the colonial traditions. Most Creoles were of French, Spanish, … Continue reading

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Clay and Calhoun and Their Really Tall Columns

As they were rivals in life, so, too, it seems, did senators Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun try to outrival each other in death—or at least their supporters did. In 2014, as part of a post I wrote about … Continue reading

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