Category Archives: Antebellum South

Book Review: Incidents in the Life of Cecilia Lawton: A Memoir of Plantation Life, War, and Reconstruction in Georgia and South Carolina

Southerners get short shrift from historians lately. They represent ignorant, mean-spirited, small-minded types of people who prefer to let others do their work for them (if aristocratically inclined) or make up excuses as to why it is alright for some … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Book Review, Books & Authors, Civilian, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Persistence of the Mardi Gras Spirit in Civil War New Orleans

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Neil P. Chatelain… Nothing embodies New Orleans more than Mardi Gras. Crowds throng parades, balls, and costumed parties, marking final celebrations before the Catholic season of Lent. Organizations host parades, customizing throws of … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Holidays | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

The Roberts Guard (Company C, Capers’ Battalion): Georgia’s Convict Soldiers

Emerging Civil War welcomes guest author John N. McDonald… Governor Joseph Brown of Georgia was a troubled man in November 1864.  Two months had passed since Sherman captured Atlanta and the Union armies were once again on the march with … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

How a Camp Became a Fort

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Sheritta Bitikofer… In the panhandle of Florida, a place that is not known for much else besides white sand beaches and prime fishing, sits a little-known and bypassed fragment of Civil War history … Continue reading

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The Secession of Mississippi

January 9, 2020, is the 160th anniversary of the secession of Mississippi Named for war hero Andrew Jackson, Jackson, Mississippi, was founded in 1821 at the intersection of the Natchez Trace and the Pearl River. Jackson himself had come through … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Antebellum South, Economics, Politics, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

A Doctor, His Enslaved Man, and North Georgia’s Union Circle (part one)

Dr. Berry Gideon, his wife, and seven daughters watched helplessly as flames devoured their home next to the Western and Atlantic Railroad, between the towns of Calhoun and Resaca, on June 18, 1864. Union soldiers allowed the family fifteen minutes … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Common Soldier, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Observing the Hanging Hour: John Brown’s Death 161 Years Ago Today

When John Brown’s body dropped through the gallows’ trap door in a field outside Charlestown, Virginia, at approximately 11 a.m. on December 2, 1859, only about 1,500 Virginia militia, Virginia Military Institute Cadets, and a handful of United States soldiers … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Personalities | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Remembering Franklin 2020

Today, November 30, is the anniversary of the 1864 battle of Franklin. When I visited the battlefield in September, I was struck by this sign outside Carnton Plantation. It serves as an invitation to all of us, as students of … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

The 1858 New Orleans Mayoral Election

This article was co-written with Michael Kraemer, a PhD student at The Ohio State University In 1803, the United States bought the Louisiana Territory from Napoléon Bonaparte. It contained many independent Native American nations, as well as New Orleans, which … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Politics | Tagged , , , , | 10 Comments

Enemy on the Georgia Home Front

Wesley Shropshire returned home from the secession convention in Milledgeville, Georgia dejected and distressed. Once final passage of the secession ordinance was certain, most Union delegates changed their votes to give the measure more force, but not Shropshire. He departed … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments