Category Archives: Antebellum South

An Eyewitness Account of John Brown’s Raid

Reverend Michael Costello was the pastor of St. Peter Catholic Church at Harpers Ferry, [West] Virginia during John Brown’s Raid. A native of County Galway, Ireland, Costello studied at All Hallows College in Dublin for the Diocese of Richmond. On … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Personalities, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Dwight Hughes

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. The Civil War … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

Book Review: Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth

Kevin Levin, a historian, educator, and blogger based in Boston, has waded into this argument keyboard blazing. The first three chapters discuss in depth the definition of a “camp slave.” When a slave-owning family sent one of their men to … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Book Review, Books & Authors, Leadership--Confederate, Monuments, Photography, Primary Sources, Sesquicentennial, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , | 13 Comments

Captain Emile Locoul and the Defense of St. James Parrish

Emile Locoul was a third generation Louisiana plantation owner. He was considered a Creole, which in Louisiana meant a person’s whose ancestors came when Louisiana was a colony and who maintained the colonial traditions. Most Creoles were of French, Spanish, … Continue reading

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Clay and Calhoun and Their Really Tall Columns

As they were rivals in life, so, too, it seems, did senators Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun try to outrival each other in death—or at least their supporters did. In 2014, as part of a post I wrote about … Continue reading

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“Somebody’s Darling!” . . . And The War Came Home, Part 3

The Civil War affected all of America. The Irish and German families who had sent their sons alone to a land across the Atlantic seeking a better life, the elite planter parents and siblings who bid goodbye to a cherished … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Wah-Who-Eeee! … And The War Came to the Rebels, Part 2

Author Margaret Mitchel wrote her version of the sound of the rebel yell as “Wah-Who-Eeee,” and that was the sound heard throughout the Southern states when Confederate general P. G. T. Beauregard opened his well-prepared cannon on shabby little Fort … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Laure “Doucette” Larendon: Beauregard’s Daughter

Among P.G.T. Beauregard his closest friends was Charles Villeré, son of Jules Villeré, a sugar cane planter in Plaquemines Parish and a member of one of the most prominent Creole families in south Louisiana. Beauregard became smitten with Marie Laure … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

Alexander Stephen and the Cornerstone Speech

On March 21, 1861—one hundred and fifty-eight years ago today—Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens was in Savannah, in his home state of Georgia. Seven states had already declared themselves seceded from the Union, and Stephens addressed a large crowd to … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 46 Comments

Eating Like A Confederate President: Davis’s Gingerbread

Find Part 1 with details about Lincoln’s Gingerbread here. Gingerbread in all its variations was a big favorite in the north, the south, and in between. Lebkuchen, the German form of gingerbread, was baked in many “Dutch” households, and others … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Holidays, Leadership--Confederate | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments