Category Archives: Antebellum South

Untangling the Marmillions, Part 2

Read Part 1 HERE Naturally, with all these V.B.s, P.B.s, and E.B.s floating around, it makes research difficult, if not impossible to deduct who is who. For instance, a “V.B. Marmillion” was listed along with many other planters in St. … Continue reading

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Untangling the Marmillions, Part 1

On January 30, 1864, Harper’s Weekly published a set of accounts from formerly enslaved blacks from New Orleans. Emancipated by Benjamin Butler during the Federal occupation of the town, these individuals came forward to give their testimonies to the atrocities … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest contributor Adam Burke…[see Part I here] Slavery’s effects on Southern industry and manufacturing devastated the Confederacy’s military manpower capacity. The antebellum North enjoyed dramatic economic and population expansion. From 1840 to 1850, population growth … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Economics, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part I

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest contributor Adam Burke… Tucked into the nook of a large brick building in historic Harpers Ferry is a conspicuous granite monolith. It stands along Potomac Street, a lesser traveled street one block … Continue reading

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On The Eve Of War: An Englishman in Washington

William Howard Russell, an influential reporter for The Times of London, toured America north and south in 1861-62 leaving a picturesque portrait of places, people, and issues. He is considered one of the first modern war correspondents for dramatic coverage … Continue reading

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The Other John Brown

ECW welcomes back guest author Max Longley… In the latter half of 1863, Republican Governor Andrew Curtin of Pennsylvania was busy with a re-election campaign against a Democrat who appealed to public war-weariness. Curtin was also campaigning to establish a … Continue reading

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Book Review: Incidents in the Life of Cecilia Lawton: A Memoir of Plantation Life, War, and Reconstruction in Georgia and South Carolina

Southerners get short shrift from historians lately. They represent ignorant, mean-spirited, small-minded types of people who prefer to let others do their work for them (if aristocratically inclined) or make up excuses as to why it is alright for some … Continue reading

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The Persistence of the Mardi Gras Spirit in Civil War New Orleans

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Neil P. Chatelain… Nothing embodies New Orleans more than Mardi Gras. Crowds throng parades, balls, and costumed parties, marking final celebrations before the Catholic season of Lent. Organizations host parades, customizing throws of … Continue reading

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The Roberts Guard (Company C, Capers’ Battalion): Georgia’s Convict Soldiers

Emerging Civil War welcomes guest author John N. McDonald… Governor Joseph Brown of Georgia was a troubled man in November 1864.  Two months had passed since Sherman captured Atlanta and the Union armies were once again on the march with … Continue reading

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How a Camp Became a Fort

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Sheritta Bitikofer… In the panhandle of Florida, a place that is not known for much else besides white sand beaches and prime fishing, sits a little-known and bypassed fragment of Civil War history … Continue reading

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