Category Archives: Civilian

Victual Particulars

One of my favorite stories comes from Miller’s Photographic History, but I never knew its source. …until recently. In The Grayjackets: and How They Lived, Fought and Died for Dixie (Richmond, 1867), by “a Confederate” [James Dabney McCabe] I have … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities | Tagged , , | 10 Comments

An Interview with Pulitzer Finalist Brian Matthew Jordan (part two)

part two of three In April, ECW’s Brian Matthew Jordan received the news that his book, Marching Home: Union Veterans and Their Unending Civil War, was selected as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history. Last week, I posted the first … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Civilian, Common Soldier, Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

The Civil War in Fairfax County

I mentioned on Thursday that I was going to be speaking that evening to the Bull Run Civil War Roundtable in Centreville, Virginia. I have a quick follow-up that I think will be of interest to hardcore Civil War buffs. On … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

A Mother’s Influence

“What will Mother say?” “Oh, how shall I tell his mother?” “Dear Mother…” The maternal parent is certainly one of the most mentioned figures in the letters, music, and battlefield cries of Civil War soldiers. With guiding influence from infancy … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Holidays | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

An Olfactory Follow-Up

On Thursday, I stirred up a big stink in Atlanta from July 1864. That wasn’t the only one: COMPLAINTS.–Some of the inmates of the Gate City Hospital complain that an old building near the hospital is filled with hides, which omit an intolerable … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Medical, Newspapers | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

You Could Feel Atlanta in Your Olfactory

“You can feel it in your olfactory,” as Loudoun Wainwright famously phrased it. …which is the subject of this editorial in the Atlanta Intelligencer of July 2, 1864. Under title of “The City,” the paper’s editors commented on a big rainstorm that suddenly … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Medical, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

“Little Photography in Jeffdom:” The Decline of Photography in the Civil War South

In 1862 Humphrey’s Journal of the Daguerreotype and Photographic Arts boasted that “The Photographic Art down South has completely died out in consequence of the war.”[i] Though an obvious overstatement, considering that southern photographers operated throughout the war, the journal … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Economics, Leadership--Confederate, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Photography, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Almira Hancock: An Officer’s Bride, Adventuress, & Homemaker (Part 2)

She opened the telegram, took a deep breath, and read aloud in a low voice: “I am severely wounded, not mortally. Join me at once in Philadelphia. Parker and Miller, I fear, are gone up.”[i] Wounded, not mortally. Join me … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Almira Hancock: An Officer’s Bride, Adventuress, & Homemaker (Part 1)

As the officers congratulated her husband and the ladies offered advice for folding dresses in traveling trunks, she glanced up at the map of America and shook her head resolutely. She had already lived in dilapidated military barracks in Missouri, … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Leadership--Federal, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

“Guilty Party:” Bessie Sulers and Schuylkill Arsenal Outwork

In John Billings’ famous Hardtack and Coffee, he references the ritual that nearly every man in the various Federal armies participated in with the opening of the spring campaign: “At the first start from camp, many men would burden themselves … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Material Culture | 1 Comment