Category Archives: Memory

“He Stood the Operation Like A Soldier:” Lucius Davis

When we think of the Civil War, we need to look beyond just a few individual days. We need to look beyond Manassas, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, or even Appomattox. Often, we need even to look beyond 1865. The war changed … Continue reading

Posted in Common Soldier, Medical, Memory | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

The Confederate Flag and the Assault on the Capitol

How does one process the image of a Confederate battle flag in the United States Capitol? “Trump did what Lee, Jackson, and Davis couldn’t in four years,” a colleague texted me as the first images of insurrectionists started appearing on … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Sieges, Ties to the War, War of 1812 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 75 Comments

Civil War Myth Busting: The Fictional Confederate Irish Brigade at Fredericksburg

Another anniversary of the battle of Fredericksburg has come and gone. Mention of the December 1862 battle immediately brings to mind the repeated Federal attacks against Marye’s Heights that all failed to reach their objective. One of the most famous … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Books & Authors, Immigrants, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Lessons for 2021 from POWs and Sieges

Last October I looked at how the broadly-parallel experiences of prisoners of war and besieged forces could provide perspectives on the coronavirus situation. Now, as 2020 turns into 2021, I again looked at these situations to see if there are … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Memory, Sieges, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daniel Harvey Hill, Educator and General

Another installment n “Tales from the Tombstone.” For other posts in the series, click here. On a recent road-trip, I had the chance to take a slight detour off the interstate and visit Davidson, North Carolina. Now known as the … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Leadership--Confederate, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

What We’ve Learned: Pondering Usable History

If but for a missing license plate, state police might not have caught Timothy McVeigh, or at least not soon after the crime. At 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995, McVeigh blew up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Lincoln, Memory, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

What We’ve Learned: “A Lot of History Every Month”

What have we learned since the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War? As it happens, those years correspond with my tenure as a contributing author to the Emerging Civil War blog starting in December 2014. Looking back over the posts, … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Who Was First at Gettysburg?

When one thinks of the red corps badge of the First Division, First Corps of the Army of the Potomac, the mind immediately jumps to everyone’s favorite black hat wearing westerners, the First Brigade, the Iron Brigade. However, another group … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Philip Cook

“Tales From the Tombstone“ On one website chronicling the history of Georgia, the opening sentence to the biography of Brigadier General Philip Cook read simply: “Perhaps the most remarkable feat of this Madison County lawyer was his rise in the … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Monuments | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

When a Monument Cherrypicks Its History

When people have the chance to learn about history, don’t we want that history to be factually correct? That’s the question I asked last week when writing about the Robert E. Lee statue at Antietam. Placed at a spot on … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Monuments, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 177 Comments