Category Archives: Memory

A Legacy of Slavery and the Civil War: America’s Gun Culture

A lone tear streamed down the cheek of Abraham Lincoln on Time magazine’s April 2011 cover commemorating the 150th anniversary of the nation’s greatest tragedy. Editors imagined the martyred president surveying today’s America and lamenting that “we’re still fighting the … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Arms & Armaments, Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 49 Comments

Things I have learned on the way to Atlanta – Johnston as Executioner

Last week’s post, about Yankee pickets firing snow bombs at each other, made me laugh. Soldier life, however, was rarely so amusing. From my forthcoming volume on the first part of the Atlanta Campaign, to be published by Savas Beatie, … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Memory, Monuments, Regiments, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Sheridan’s Veterans: Returning To The Shenandoah Valley

In the 1880’s a Union veteran’s organization known as Sheridan’s Veterans Association made several trips to the Shenandoah Valley. These “excursions” gave comrades a chance to reunite and revisit their old battlefields in the Valley. Some veterans brought their families, … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Reality vs. Myth Regarding Abraham Lincoln’s War Elephants

It almost sounds like any typical Civil War engagement. A bugle sounds in the foggy distance and Confederate soldiers raise their muskets for a crushing volley. They quickly notice something is different. Deeper thuds have replaced horse gallops. As the … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Lincoln, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

A Ghoulish Relic from a Horse’s Death along the Valley Pike

There are weird things in American Civil War history…and then there are weird things. It’s October 31st and time to retrieve something very strange or ghoulish for discussion, so how about the preserved hoof of a horse? That’s right. A … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

“The Birth of a Nation” comes to Phoenix, Part 2

Part 1 is here After the municipal elections, which had supposedly been influenced by anti-censorship white voters, the makers of Birth of a Nation tried again to crack open the Phoenix market. In April, just over a month after the … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“The Birth of a Nation” comes to Phoenix, Part 1

In 1916, A.  J. Sampson of Phoenix Arizona, was Assistant Adjutant General of the Grand Army of the Republic’s (G. A. R.) Department of Arizona. He probably influenced the G. A. R. in the Grand Canyon State to wade into … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

The Wilderness in Seattle

“Luxury at the edge of the Wilderness” the sign proclaimed. It hung from the side of a building next to my harborside hotel in Seattle, inviting motorists to image themselves away from the traffic. A woman on horseback, wearing a … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Civil War Medicine: Florence Nightingale, The Influencer

While every woman who volunteered to nurse during the Civil War had their own reasons for doing so, one of the more popularly cited motivators for these women was not even American. Florence Nightingale, the “Lady with the Lamp” who … Continue reading

Posted in Medical, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Echoes of Reconstruction: Confederate Jubal Early Explains the Cause of the Civil War (part two)

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome back Patrick Young, author of The Reconstruction Era blog. This is the second in a two-part series looking at the ways Jubal Early’s book The Heritage of the South tried to “explain” the … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 76 Comments