Category Archives: Newspapers

A Peek into the “Critic’s Corner” in Civil War News

SHAG-A-DOO-LA. Those of us who write about the Civil War for fun (rarely for profit) get our ideas from any number of sources. One never knows when or how some inspiration will occur. Driving to the store recently, I heard … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Stolen Pie, but a Bigger Prize for Sergeant Young at Petersburg

Today is the favorite holiday for math teachers. March Fourteenth (3-14) represents the first three numbers in the mathematical constant pi. I’ve been using pi (3.14159…) a lot more than I had anticipated as a historian. Each time I rescale … Continue reading

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Celebrate the Expected Capture of Richmond with a New Stove!

I found this humorous newspaper article while searching through historic Vermont newspapers. Burlington entrepreneur J.B. Wardell hoped to cash in on the public’s joy at what he anticipated to be the end of the Civil War by attaching that jubilation … Continue reading

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Another Courier’s Perspective: William Henry Jenkins and the Death of A.P. Hill

Earlier this week I shared some new information discovered about William Bennett Kirkpatrick, a previously unidentified courier who relayed A.P. Hill’s last message to his Third Corps headquarters on April 2, 1865. Within the hour, Corporal John Watson Mauk shot … Continue reading

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Identifying “Courier Kirkpatrick” on A.P. Hill’s Last Ride

Lieutenant General Ambrose Powell Hill was killed in the aftermath of the successful Union attack near Petersburg on the morning of April 2, 1865. Sergeant George Washington Tucker, Jr., the general’s chief of couriers, was the only Confederate present at … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Newspapers, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Centennial Shad Bake

Chris Mackowski’s recent post about George Pickett’s culinary legacy reminded me of seeing a few newspaper articles that featured cooking shad while researching the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the battle of Five Forks. None of those articles were … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Memory, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Poet’s Perspective: Herman Melville and the Civil War

It was November of 1860, and America had a new president. He was highly popular among the northern states, but he was widely disliked in the South. At the same time you have Herman Melville, famous for his 1851 novel … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Soldier-Artists and the Battle Experience (Part I)

This is the first of two posts regarding soldier-artists and their depictions of the experience of battle. “Pshaw. It’s no use, they can’t picture a battle,” exclaimed the young son of Reverend A. M. Stewart of the 102nd Pennsylvania Volunteers, a … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Material Culture, Memory, Newspapers, Photography, Primary Sources, Weapons | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Battlefield Markers & Monuments: The Civil War Correspondents Memorial

Near the summit of Crampton’s Gap, driving up from the west, Gapland Road makes a quick curve due east before snaking over the top of South Mountain and curling down the far side. This last little juke, right next to … Continue reading

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Struck by a Fired Ramrod, Part 3: Who Shot Major Ellis?

This is part three of a three-part series. Part one. Part two. For decades after William Ellis’s death, his story concluded for all but his mother. Later that month, August 1864, the already widowed Catharine Ellis began the process of … Continue reading

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