Category Archives: Newspapers

Granger’s Juneteenth Orders and the Limiting of Freedom

Juneteenth is recognized as the symbolic end of slavery in the United States. Galveston, Texas, held out as a Confederate stronghold after Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. Once occupied by Union forces, Major General Gordon Granger established his headquarters … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Memory, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

The Many Deaths of A.P. Hill

I hope to share more about the story of A.P. Hill’s death at this year’s Symposium. Previous historians and two of the participants themselves have ironed out the well-known event, so I am basing my presentation on the sequence through … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Memory, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard in the National Tribune

I’m doing a lot of reading in the National Tribune, “the premier newspaper published for Union veterans” in Washington, 1877-1943. This is thanks to 1) its availability online and 2) Dr. Richard A. Sauers’ comprehensive index to all of its … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Newspapers, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Leap Year Melancholy

1864 was the Civil War’s leap year. I have not found too many references to leap day. The most notable campaign event on February 29, 1864 involved the Kirkpatrick-Dahlgren raiders travelling from Spotsylvania to Hanover on their route to the … Continue reading

Posted in Newspapers, Primary Sources | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Abraham’s Fifteen Minutes of Fame (pt. 3)

Enslaved Abraham became Free Abraham in a matter of seconds. His body arched over the line from the Confederate 3rd Louisiana Redan to the Union 81st Illinois Volunteer Infantry. As the men in blue helped him to his feet, it … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Medical, Newspapers, Personalities, Sieges, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Just Who Was Abraham? (pt. 2)

Before the war, there was an enslaved man called Abraham. His last name was unknown. Here is what is known: The black man known as Abraham was between 18-25 years old at the time of the Siege of Vicksburg. He … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Personalities, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Our Thanks to Civil War News

Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been highlighting some of the work in Civil War News. We’re big fans of the work publisher Jack Melton does each month to keep the Civil War community plugged in to all the … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War, Newspapers | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Primary Sources: Local Newspapers

My first foray into Civil War newspapers came almost twenty years ago while researching Camp Anderson, an early war training camp that had existed for all of a few weeks in south-central Ohio. I traveled to a local library to … Continue reading

Posted in Newspapers, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Grinch of St. Joseph, Missouri

Nearly 100 years before the 1957 classic Dr. Seuss book appeared on the shelves, there was another Grinch who lived in the frontier town of St. Joseph, Missouri during the Civil War. Typically, we think of Christmas during the Civil … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Newspapers, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

World War I sparked the memory of a Civil War hero’s funeral

With the centennial anniversary of the armistice effectively ending World War I having recently passed, it seemed fitting to stumble upon the article reproduced below from the September 21, 1918 issue of the Watertown Daily Times (NY). The article is titled “Funeral of Civil … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Memory, Newspapers, Primary Sources | Tagged , , | 1 Comment