Category Archives: Politics

Lee-Jackson Day 2017

As is my custom when visiting Lexington, Virginia, I swung by Stonewall Jackson Cemetery on Saturday to pay my respects to the general. I was in town at the invitation of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to speak at their … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Memory, Monuments, Politics, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Year in Review 2016: #1

July 20, 2016 turned out to be ECW’s biggest day ever as far as readership. The numbers were driven, in part, by a pair of wildly popular posts that appeared on July 19. The first was Chris Kolakowski’s Civil War Echoes … Continue reading

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Year In Review: 1860’s Politics

To put modern electoral events in a unique perspective, Emerging Civil War hosted a special blog series “1860’s Politics” in October – November 2016. ECW authors and a couple guest writers joined the effort, and the series proved to be enjoyable, educational, and … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Lincoln, Politics, Year in Review | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Meade’s Account of Mine Run

One of my favorite pieces of correspondence from the war is a Dec. 2, 2863, letter that George Gordon Meade wrote to his wife in the wake of the Mine Run campaign. The commander of the Army of the Potomac, … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Politics | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

1860’s Politics: A Conclusion

It’s been a history-making month in modern America with the 2016 Presidential Election, and I think we managed to have some educational fun here on Emerging Civil War with our examination of 1860’s Politics. It’s time to close this political … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Confederate Political Songs?

The North had many political songs for candidate praise and candidate bashing. What about the South? Did the Confederacy write music about their political leaders? The short answer: yes and no. Here’s the longer answer:

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1860’s Politics: Songs For The Campaign Trail

During the past few weeks, we’ve noted some similarities between political campaigns in the 1860’s and the modern era. We’ve learned that mudslinging and “creative insults” aren’t new. We’ve reminded ourselves that Americans are opinionated. There’s one aspect of 1860’s politics … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Lincoln, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

1860’s Politics: Why Do We think McClellan Was the “Peace Candidate”? Because the Rebels Thought So

A thoughtful respondent to my recent submission to the ECW blog, “1860’s Politics,” wondered why Gen. George McClellan, Democratic nominee for U. S. president in 1864, waited until after Sherman’s troops captured Atlanta, Sept. 2, 1864, before he announced his … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

1860’s Politics: Lincoln-Douglas Debates Continue, Part III: Self-Government and Political Correctness

If we define political correctness as demanding conformance with favored positions, not tolerating contrary opinions, and branding opponents or perceived opponents as radicals (“they are just evil/crazy/stupid”), all without offering rational counter arguments, then these are not new phenomena. Abraham … Continue reading

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A Reminder at the Polls

At my polling place in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, this morning, the line stretched long out the door of Wilderness Elementary School, wrapping along the edge of the traffic circle. At 6:45 a.m., the temperature was just rising past thirty degrees. … Continue reading

Posted in Politics, Ties to the War, USCT | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment