Category Archives: Politics

Hiram Revels and Blanche Bruce: America’s First Black Senators

On February 25, 1870, visitors in the U.S. Senate gallery burst into applause when the new Republican senator from Mississippi entered the chamber. This man was no ordinary senator. He was Hiram R. Revels, and he was the first African … Continue reading

Posted in Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Two Union Veterans: The Election of 1880, Part 2

Part 2 of 2 in a short series. Find Part 1 and details about the presidential candidates here. During the presidential campaign that followed, both Garfield and Hancock attempted to follow the era’s tradition that candidates did little actual campaigning. … Continue reading

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Two Union Veterans: The Election of 1880, Part 1

Ever heard the old joke that in order to be President of the United States after the Civil War, you only needed to be Republican, be a Union veteran, and have a beard? You can be forgiven for thinking it … Continue reading

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When a President Dies

The public honors given to the 41stPresident of the United States, George H. W. Bush, brought clearly into focus the respect our country owes the office of the Presidency. However, many parts of President Bush’s obsequies were presented on television … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Ties to the War, Weapons | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Inaugural Express: Abraham Lincoln’s Train Journey from Springfield to Washington

One of my favorite trains—and there are several—is the Inaugural Express, the series of trains taken by President-elect Lincoln as he made his famous journey from his home in Springfield to the Executive Mansion in Washington. Standardization of track sizes … Continue reading

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Prisoner of War or Constructive Deserter?

It pays to read the (often lengthy) footnotes when researching first-person accounts in the venerable Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Seemingly minor vignettes can speak to big issues. An article by Colonel Rush C. Hawkins describing his service … Continue reading

Posted in Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Politics | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

British Rebels: The International Civil War

The Confederacy campaigned vigorously for international recognition and support while the United States risked war with Great Britain to prevent that eventuality. Civil War aficionados might be familiar with “King Cotton” and perhaps the Trent Affair, but few recognize how … Continue reading

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Beyond the 13th Amendment: Ending Slavery in the Indian Territory

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Neil P. Chatelain When exactly did legal slavery end in the United States? Many Americans unfamiliar with the particulars of the Civil War respond with 1863 and the issuing of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. Still … Continue reading

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SC’s Constitutional Convention @ the Charleston Club

Walking down Meeting Street in Charleston the other day, I passed the site of the former Charleston Club. The spot is marked with a historical sign that tells the story of South Carolina’s first postwar Constitutional Convention.  

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Politics, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

“The Last Notable American Duel”: California and its influence on the Civil War

Part of a series about California & The Civil War Lately, there has been a rumble here in California that cannot be attributed to another earthquake. As Civil War historians widen their scope, it must be observed that the real … Continue reading

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