Showing results for "Civil War Echoes"

Day One: Stone Mountain

Part three in a series Stonewall Jackson has always loomed large in my family’s life. He’s the reason Stephanie fell in love with the Civil War back when she was four, and her love affair dragged us all with it. It’s been going on now for seventeen years. Now he looms over us quite literally—fifty […]

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World on Fire

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author Dwight Hughes. This post is based on a forthcoming book on the CSS Shenandoah. In the cool dusk of Sunday, 2 April 1865, Abraham Lincoln sat with Rear Admiral David Porter on the upper deck of the USS Malvern at the massive supply depot of City […]

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Following Orders: from “your Obd’t Servant” to SMEAC and METT-T

The Battle of Gettysburg has produced no end of enduring controversies, discussions, and disputes. Recently, on one of the Facebook sites devoted to exploring that battle, one such discussion surfaced yet again. This time the question was about J.E.B. Stuart, and his famous ride. Was Stuart late? Did he disobey Robert E. Lee’s orders and […]

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Rebels Down Under

Today, we are pleased to welcome back guest author Dwight Hughes. Part One in a Series. One hundred fifty years ago this month, the CSS Shenandoah steamed into Hobson’s Bay, Melbourne, Australia with flag flying. Vessels large and small saluted by dipping their ensigns; cheers were given and cheerfully returned. Like a great bird coming […]

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Lee’s Inverted-V Salient

The Confederate position at the North Anna River has usually been characterized as an inverted V, but another way to look at it is as a giant salient—a portion of the line that juts out from the main line. Viewed in that light, echoes of the salient at Spotsylvania begin to reverberate. Salients are inherently weak positions, […]

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“Sally had a baby, and the baby had red hair”—part two

Today, we bring you the second part of Lance Herdegen’s two-part piece about the music of the Iron Brigade, which was not only one of the most famous fighting units in the Army of the Potomac but whose members also happened to have a particular ear for music. “Any veteran memory of the long marching […]

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“Sally had a baby, and the baby had red hair”—part one

We’re pleased today to bring you part one of a two-part piece from guest poster Lance Herdegen, author of The Iron Brigade in Civil War and Memory. The Iron Brigade in the old Army of the Potomac made its own music. Any veteran memory of the long marching columns evoked faint echoes of the soldiers […]

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Pick #3 in my Top 10 List: A set of maps

Part of a Series: Books Every Civil War Buff Ought to Own The third book, or books, every Civil War buff needs on the bookshelf is a good set of maps. These are invaluable–nothing less. They give form to the function of a campaign or battle and, depending on your choices, can put you virtually […]

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Not Billy Idol’s Rebel Yell!

Any cursory reading of the Civil War in general will mention, somewhere, the Rebel Yell. Poems have been written about its eerie sound, creeping up Yankee spines into Yankee brains and scaring Yankees spitless. At about a zillion reenactments, the Confederates come at the Union troops, screaming at the top of their lungs, and halfway […]

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