Tag Archives: 1864 Election

Corresponding About The 1864 Election

In 1864, Mary Emma Randolph and Walter G. Dunn corresponded about the 1864 election. Walter, a private in the 11th New Jersey but serving in the Invalid Corps during 1864, voted for Lincoln and generally supported the Republican Party. His … Continue reading

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Did Frederick Douglass Influence “The Blind Memorandum”?

The timing. The national circumstances. The reports of what two great men discussed. It raises the question: did Frederick Douglass influence Abraham Lincoln’ decision to draft the document referred to as “The Blind Memorandum”? On August 23, 1864 – one … Continue reading

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Of Dentists & Elections

I’ve been reading 1864 entries from Benjamin Brown French’s journal this summer as part of my tangent study for perspective on how folks in the north  responded to the impending presidential election. French offers quite a contrast of subjects in … Continue reading

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The Patriotism of the 170th…

I’ve always been fascinated with the Ohio National Guard “100 Days” men who were called into service in the spring of 1864 to guard the forts, bridges, blockhouses and railroads, thereby freeing up veteran regiments for the summer campaign. The … Continue reading

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“Moulded in the form of a spread eagle”: Mosby’s Rangers, the Fourth of July, and a Dispute Over Cake

Independence Day in 1864 seemed like it could have been the last such celebration for the United States. The Presidential Election of 1864 loomed four months in the future, and a Lincoln reelection seemed very much in doubt. Jubal Early’s … Continue reading

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Symposium Spotlight: Rea Andrew Redd

Certainly there were turning points during the war that occurred off the battlefield. Returning to a political turning point, this week’s Symposium Spotlight features Rea Andrew Redd and his preview of the 1864 election. If you still have not purchased … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Songs For The Campaign Trail

During the past few weeks, we’ve noted some similarities between political campaigns in the 1860’s and the modern era. We’ve learned that mudslinging and “creative insults” aren’t new. We’ve reminded ourselves that Americans are opinionated. There’s one aspect of 1860’s politics … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Why Do We think McClellan Was the “Peace Candidate”? Because the Rebels Thought So

A thoughtful respondent to my recent submission to the ECW blog, “1860’s Politics,” wondered why Gen. George McClellan, Democratic nominee for U. S. president in 1864, waited until after Sherman’s troops captured Atlanta, Sept. 2, 1864, before he announced his … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: How Did Voter Apparel Show Support For Candidates?

Do you wear t-shirts to support a favorite candidate? How about a bumper sticker on your car or truck? Hopefully, you got an “I voted” sticker today! In the 1860’s, they didn’t wear t-shirts, and I have yet to find a … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Statistics & The Soldiers’ Vote

It’s Election Day in the U.S.A. (Don’t forget to vote). As we watch the tally of popular and electoral votes this evening, remember that presidential elections and the electoral college have been in existence since 1787 (when the Constitution was signed). … Continue reading

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