Tag Archives: 1864 Election

Symposium Spotlight: Rea Andrew Redd

Certainly there were turning points during the war that occurred off the battlefield. Returning to a political turning point, this week’s Symposium Spotlight features Rea Andrew Redd and his preview of the 1864 election. If you still have not purchased … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Songs For The Campaign Trail

During the past few weeks, we’ve noted some similarities between political campaigns in the 1860’s and the modern era. We’ve learned that mudslinging and “creative insults” aren’t new. We’ve reminded ourselves that Americans are opinionated. There’s one aspect of 1860’s politics … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Why Do We think McClellan Was the “Peace Candidate”? Because the Rebels Thought So

A thoughtful respondent to my recent submission to the ECW blog, “1860’s Politics,” wondered why Gen. George McClellan, Democratic nominee for U. S. president in 1864, waited until after Sherman’s troops captured Atlanta, Sept. 2, 1864, before he announced his … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: How Did Voter Apparel Show Support For Candidates?

Do you wear t-shirts to support a favorite candidate? How about a bumper sticker on your car or truck? Hopefully, you got an “I voted” sticker today! In the 1860’s, they didn’t wear t-shirts, and I have yet to find a … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Statistics & The Soldiers’ Vote

It’s Election Day in the U.S.A. (Don’t forget to vote). As we watch the tally of popular and electoral votes this evening, remember that presidential elections and the electoral college have been in existence since 1787 (when the Constitution was signed). … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: After All These Years, Why Do We Think President McClellan Would Have Given the Rebels an Armistice?

Approaching the 1864 Northern presidential election, students of the Atlanta Campaign tend to focus on how Sherman’s capture of the city on Sept. 2, 1864 helped President Lincoln win re-election. Conversely, we ponder Southerners’ hopes that the Democratic candidate, Maj. … Continue reading

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Presentations From the 2014 Emerging Civil War Symposium-Meg Thompson

As we gear up for this years Emerging Civil War Symposium at Stevenson Ridge, we wanted to share this presentation from last years ECW Symposium. As you may recall, we were honored to have C-SPAN cover our first major symposium. Below is … Continue reading

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Long Abraham Lincoln a Little Longer: Soldier Voting in the Election of 1864 Pt. 4

 Many Democrats were hoping that the men in the field, particularly those in the Army of the Potomac, would remain loyal to former commanding general George McClellan. They underestimated the ability of the Union soldier to analyze for himself just … Continue reading

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Long Abraham Lincoln a Little Longer: Soldier Voting in the Election of 1864 Pt. 3  

Despite provisions by most states, efforts by the Democratic Party ensured widespread disenfranchisement of many Union soldiers. Every state that attempted to amend legislation to provide for some method of soldier voting failed if voted on by a legislature with … Continue reading

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Long Abraham Lincoln a Little Longer: Soldier Voting in the Election of 1864 Pt. 2

The election of 1862 was the first electoral contest in the history of the United States to raise widespread questions about the voting rights of soldiers and sailors. Before then, with a small regular Army and an even smaller Navy, … Continue reading

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