Tag Archives: Abolition

John Wolcott Phelps’ Emancipation Proclamation

The voyage of the U.S. Frigate Constitution ended at Ship island, a barrier island off the Gulf coast of Mississippi in December, 1861. Prior to disembarking, Brigadier General John Wolcott Phelps gathered all passengers on deck and recited one of … Continue reading

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Finding Missouri Governor and Union Brigadier General Thomas C. Fletcher in Hillsboro

For many history buffs and road trippers, rural Jefferson County, Missouri is usually not very high – or maybe not at all – on the Civil War bucket list of sites to see. Sitting due south of St. Louis is … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Figures of the Civil War and the Women’s Suffrage Movement

Nearly 150 years ago, the 15th Amendment extended the franchise to African American men. A generation later the 19th Amendment gave the vote to both Black and White women. Both of these events occurred long after the end of the … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian, Personalities, Politics, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

BookChat with Brian Luskey, Author of Men is Cheap

I was pleased to spend some time recently with a new book by historian Brian Luskey, associate professor of history at West Virginia University. Luskey is the author of Men Is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War … Continue reading

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“But with blood” – John Brown, Violence, and Abolition in Kansas

On a cold December morning in 1859 in a jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, John Brown reflected on his role in the desperate fight for abolition. Less than two months prior, he had led a small army of 21 … Continue reading

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“But his soul goes marching on.” Brown, Douglass, and the Radicals

Today abolitionism is praised with few reservations, but it was a fringe movement in the 1830s. Its followers took a lonely moral stand. William Lloyd Garrison in 1831 declared “I am in earnest. I will not equivocate – I will … Continue reading

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October The Sixteenth – “Alive With Ghosts Today”

Perhaps You will remember John Brown. John Brown Who took his gun, Took twenty-one companions, White and black, Went to shoot your way to freedom Where two rivers meet And the hills of the North And the hills of the … Continue reading

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John Brown’s Raid 160th: An Introduction

One hundred and sixty years ago this month (October 2019), twenty-two men embarked on a mission that shocked the nation and accelerated the rush toward Civil War. The event is now popularly called “John Brown’s Raid” and is viewed as … Continue reading

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Did Frederick Douglass Influence “The Blind Memorandum”?

The timing. The national circumstances. The reports of what two great men discussed. It raises the question: did Frederick Douglass influence Abraham Lincoln’ decision to draft the document referred to as “The Blind Memorandum”? On August 23, 1864 – one … Continue reading

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General Francis Barlow and The Letters He Destroyed on July 1, 1863

General Francis C. Barlow placed his division of the Union XI Corps on a rise of high ground, north of the town of Gettysburg. Without adequate reinforcements to anchor a defensive line, his exposed troops took the brunt of the … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments