Tag Archives: Bruce Catton

The Crater Sent a Monster Home to Maine

ECW is pleased to welcome back Brian Swartz, author of the new Emerging Civil War Series book Passing Through the Fire: Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain in the Civil War. Brian adapted this post for us from a series of posts published … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Common Soldier | Tagged , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Had Come Close to a Dazzling Victory

Posted in Battles, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

When President Kennedy–and Professor Wiley–Stepped In

In the final report of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission, issued in 1968, Chairman Allan Nevins recalled “the great wave of popular interest in the Civil War” that led Congress to authorize the Commission in 1957. He also remembered … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How I Got Hooked on Franklin: The Story Behind Let Us Die Like Men

My story for Franklin began when I was around ten years old. The stories my grandparents told inspired my love of history, and my dad’s fateful purchase of Bruce Catton’s American Heritage Picture History of the Civil War sparked my … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War Series | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Antietam Eve: The Night of September 16, 1862

“The quiet that precedes a battle has something of the terrible in it,” wrote an Ohio soldier recalling the night of September 16, 1862. That night in the fields and woodlots surrounding Sharpsburg was an awful night for those who … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

September 16, 1862: The Night Of No Return

Civil War soldiers vividly remembered, and recalled, certain days of their military careers, both the highs and lows, the good ones and the bad ones. For those soldier participants in the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, the September 17, … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Grant, the Wilderness, and the Loneliness of Command

On the evening of May 6, 1864, Lieutenant General U.S. Grant considered the day’s events. The Battle of the Wilderness had just ended its second day, and Grant’s forces had been  beaten and battered in a way he’d never seen. … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ed Bonekemper’s Lost Cause Fact-Check (part one)

Part one of two Historians debunked the myth of the Lost Cause decades ago, but it still defines the way many (if not most) Americans remember the narrative of the Civil War. Its influence on popular imagination holds sway over … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Thoughts on Ken Burns: Chris Kolakowski

This series really brought the war to life in a human way for me. It still holds up all these years later, and will do so for a long time to come. In that sense it belongs in the category … Continue reading

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A Surfeit of Heroes: Custer At Gettysburg, July 3, 1863 Part I of a 2-part Series

In American history, it is doubtful if any battle has been studied more closely than the battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863. Strategy, tactics, weather, politics, communications, personalities, and just plain luck have been written about ad nauseam. The historiography … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Politics, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments