Tag Archives: casualties

“I Felt Keenly All the Horrors of War”: Psychological Experiences of Civil War Generals During the Mexican War

There is no shortage of connections between the Mexican War (1846-48) and the American Civil War. When Lee and Grant met at Appomattox in April 1865, the two adversaries eased the tension by evoking memories of the Mexican War. Lee … Continue reading

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A Conversation with Philip Gerard on The Last Battleground (conclusion)

Part six of six We’ve been talking this week with Philip Gerard, author of The Last Battleground: The Civil War Comes to North Carolina (UNC Press, 2019). During the course of my conversation with him, one thing theme that has … Continue reading

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A Conversation with Philip Gerard on The Last Battleground (part two)

Part two of six Yesterday, we began a conversation with author Philip Gerard about his excellent new book The Last Battleground: The Civil War Comes to North Carolina (UNC Press, 2019). “I started out knowing pretty much nothing about the … Continue reading

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Giving No Quarter – How the 39th Missouri Lost the Highest Percentage of Men Killed in a Single Engagement of the Civil War

Ever since the guns went silent in 1865, there has always been a debate about casualty rates for Civil War units and battles among historians and enthusiasts alike. The regiments who sustained these enormous casualty rates have been immortalized in … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , | 14 Comments

American Battlefield Trust’s Former Teacher of the Year Collects Bottlecaps to Represent Civil War Death Toll 

[Editor’s Note: At the 2018 American Battlefield Trust Teacher Institute, ECW Editor in Chief Chris Mackowski met the Trust’s 2016 Teacher of the Year, Phil Caskey, who told him about a class project intended to capture the full scale of … Continue reading

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Not Just Antietam – September 17, 1862 In Perspective

Wednesday, September 17, 1862. is rightly classed as the bloodiest day in American history. In that 24-hour period, more Americans fell killed, wounded, captured, or missing, than in any like 24-hour period before or since. This contention rests almost totally … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Civil War Events, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Year In Review 2017: #6

Analysis of Civil War photographs and the era’s changing attitudes toward death are addressed in this informative and reflective blog post. Using some well-known photographs from Gettysburg battlefield, the author discusses the history surrounding the images.

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Alexander Gardner and the Good Death

Of the thousands of Civil War photographs, only several truly iconic images exist that specialists and non-specialists alike immediately recognize. One such image is the subject of today’s post: Timothy O’Sullivan’s “The Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg.” The scene … Continue reading

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U.S. Grant and the Shadow of Cold Harbor

At 4:30 a.m. on the morning of June 3, 1864, the II, VI and XVIII Corps commenced their assault on the Confederate line at Cold Harbor. One New Yorker recalled “as soon as the skirmishers were engaged, our artillery opened … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Chickamauga: A Sobering Thought

by Lee White One hundred and fifty years ago today, there were more than 5,000 men alive here in Walker and Catoosa counties that, by Friday evening, would be dead. More than 25,000 more would be maimed and torn; many … Continue reading

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