Tag Archives: civil war memory

Shiloh and Private Samuel Chick

In studying up on my family’s genealogy in 2017 I found ancestors who fought both North and South. They are mostly cousins. I am the direct descendant of Private Samuel Chick of Company E of the 44th Tennessee. The regiment … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Common Soldier, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

ECW Weekender: Emancipation Memorial

Thinking about heading to Washington D.C. this month or in the near future to study African American history? While the National Museum of African American History and Culture is a highlight and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is another … Continue reading

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John William Jones: The “Fighting Parson” Remembers The War

Emerging Civil War welcomes guest author Christopher Martin. Events of recent years have drawn attention to the many Confederate monuments across the county. Immense debate and controversy surrounds many of them, with many people curious of the memory of the … Continue reading

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On Watching Gone with the Wind in 2018

Patricia Dawn Chick (born Acker) was my mother. Her favorite movie was Gone with the Wind. It might seem odd since she was from Indiana, but her roots went back to the Dossett family of Kentucky. They were ripped apart … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory | Tagged , , , , , | 32 Comments

Turning Points: Gone With The Wind

December 15, 1939, marked a turning in interpretation and image of the American Civil War. Perhaps one could argue that the turning point had started earlier in 1936 when the novel that inspired the movie hit shelves across the nation, … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

“Something Abides”: Joshua L. Chamberlain and Civil War Memory

As it was for millions of his generation, the Civil War was the defining event of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain’s life.  Veterans from both sides took understandable pride in their service, wrote their memoirs, and joined veterans’ organizations.  In all of … Continue reading

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Modern Photography: Quiet Contradiction

ECW welcomes back guest author (and photographer!) Michael Aubrecht Battlefields are peculiar places. When you visit any hallowed grounds, everything is perfect. The grass is neatly trimmed and the marble markers are polished. The freshly painted cannons are all lined … Continue reading

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Longstreet Goes West: Conclusions

James Longstreet’s time in the Western Theater has by and large, not garnered accolades. The prevailing western-centric view casts him as a haughty eastern interloper, come to further his own ambitions at Bragg’s expense. Historians of a more eastern bent … Continue reading

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Longstreet Goes West, part nine: The November of our discontent

Part Nine in a Series Both Bragg and Longstreet – indeed every Confederate from Richmond on down – understood that to be successful, any movement into East Tennessee must be conducted quickly, and in sufficient strength. The idea was to … Continue reading

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Longstreet Goes West, part six: Midnight Madness

Part Six in a Series October of 1863 was a lean month for the Union Army of the Cumberland, trapped in Chattanooga. Joe Wheeler’s Rebel cavalry kicked off the month by destroying a Union supply train of nearly 800 wagons … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Campaigns, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Sieges, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments