Tag Archives: Civil War poetry

October The Sixteenth – “Alive With Ghosts Today”

Perhaps You will remember John Brown. John Brown Who took his gun, Took twenty-one companions, White and black, Went to shoot your way to freedom Where two rivers meet And the hills of the North And the hills of the … Continue reading

Posted in Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Union Heroic Poetry: Kearny at Seven Pines

I’ve probably been reading or looking in all the wrong places, but I’ve had a hard time finding “heroic style” poetry for dead Union officers. (I mean the ones that died in battle ’cause I know they’re all dead now.) … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors | Tagged , | 3 Comments

“The Lively Old Lady” – A Poem About Civil War Knitting

Yesterday, I sat in an archive basement, looking through material about women’s efforts to support the Union during the Civil War. Yesterday was also my Grandma Barbara’s birthday. She is no longer with us, so it was a bittersweet moment … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

“Freedom!” Their Battle-Cry: 1863 Poetry For African American Soldiers

Poetry has many form and uses, and this writing form has legendarily been used to celebrate heroes. Some of the earliest epics in World History – Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey – were crafted in poetry form. Through meter, rhythm, and … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Poet’s Perspective: Melville On Pickett’s Charge

So few poets chose to write about the American Civil War that it is sometimes described as the “unwritten war.” Herman Melville, however, was among the few who chose to do so. His collection of poems on the war, in … Continue reading

Posted in Battles | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

A Poet’s Perspective: On Stonewall Jackson’s Death

“I have always desired to die on Sunday.” — General Thomas ‘Stonewall’ Jackson. On May 2, 1863, shots rang out from the 18th North Carolina line in the woods at Chancellorsville. Unbeknownst to the soldiers at the time, they were … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

“The Women Who Went To The Field”

In 1892, Clara Barton shared a poem she had written about women during the Civil War when she spoke at a meeting of the National Woman’s Relief Corps. She paid tribute to the women who came alongside the soldiers and … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Poet’s Perspective: March into Virginia

By July 1861, the tension described in “Misgivings” and “The Conflict of Convictions” had been realized. The United States was at war with itself. In his poem “March Into Virginia,” Melville describes the first battle fought between the North and … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

A Poet’s Perspective: Herman Melville and the Civil War

It was November of 1860, and America had a new president. He was highly popular among the northern states, but he was widely disliked in the South. At the same time you have Herman Melville, famous for his 1851 novel … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Longfellow, the “Organ of Muskets,” and the Civil War

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Rob Wilson ECW’s December 24 re-posting of Meg Groeling thoughtful piece about Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s 1863 poem “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” was, for me, a welcome introduction to the work. No … Continue reading

Posted in Arms & Armaments, Memory, National Park Service | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments