Tag Archives: D.H. Hill

Fighting in Slippers: Longstreet at Antietam

In September 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac River and into Maryland for the first time. It was an effort to capitalize on a summer of stunning Confederate successes in the … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Artillery, Battles, Leadership--Confederate | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

On The March: Respectfully, Jubal A. Early

Headquarters 2d corps, A. No.–Va. To Gen. Jubal A. Early, Commanding Division: General- Gen. Jackson’s compliments to Gen. Early, and he would like to be informed why he saw so many stragglers in rear of your division to-day. Respectfully, A. … Continue reading

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Stolen War Department Marker Recovered at Antietam

Emerging Civil War welcomes guest author Matthew Chilton… On February 22, 2021, I noticed a familiar  item – seemingly a ca. 1890’s War Department directional marker –  was being advertised for an upcoming estate sale at a local auction in … Continue reading

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Daniel Harvey Hill, Educator and General

Another installment n “Tales from the Tombstone.” For other posts in the series, click here. On a recent road-trip, I had the chance to take a slight detour off the interstate and visit Davidson, North Carolina. Now known as the … Continue reading

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“As glorious a death as a man can die”: Col. Guilford Bailey at the Battle of Seven Pines

Silas Casey’s Federals huddled behind their breastworks constituting the division’s main line of defense and listened to the growing cacophony of musketry and artillery to their front. For nearly two hours, they heard Confederate attacks slam against Casey’s front line … Continue reading

Posted in Artillery, Battles, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Did Alexander Gardner photograph Charles Tew’s corpse in the Sunken Road?

Charles Tew’s story is compelling. Daniel Harvey Hill called him “one of the most finished scholars on the continent, and [who] had no superior as a soldier in the field.”(1) Indeed he was. Tew graduated first in his class from … Continue reading

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Mistake or Cover Up? Seven Pines, May 31, 1862

In late May 1862 George McClellan’s massive army was at the outskirts of Richmond, trying to move a few miles closer to the city so it could employ its massive siege guns. Confederate commander Joseph E. Johnston was desperately searching … Continue reading

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Symposium Fallout: Is Leading from the Front All that Bad?

This weekend’s symposium gave me a lot to think about on my drive home from the Jackson Shrine on Sunday. The thought bubbles did not stop popping up when I got home either. There was a lot to think about … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 17 Comments

Was Lee’s “Lost Order” a Turning Point? (part three)

(part three of three) What exactly the Lost Order told McClellan has been the subject of much heated debate and controversy almost from the moment he glanced its contents. From an intelligence standpoint, the Lost Order was important to McClellan, … Continue reading

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Seven Pines and Seven Days: Robert E. Lee Replaces “Old Joe” Johnston (part three)

(part three of three) On the morning of June 29, Robert E. Lee was faced with an opportunity few commanders ever have. His enemy, with 100,000 men, hundreds of guns, and thousands of wagons, was retreating across his front. McClellan … Continue reading

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