Tag Archives: Economics

One Review, Two Books: Ways and Means and Bonds of War

“In January [1865], economist Amasa Walker wrote on ‘men and money,’ the two elements that Walker believed were ‘indispensable to war.’ Walker added, ‘You may, indeed, have money without men, but cannot have men without money.’”1 – David Thomson in … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Books & Authors, Economics | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Hurrah for Homespun!

Poetry and songs that came out of the Civil War, entertaining as they are, served as a useful vehicle for rhetoric that supported their respective sides. Songs like “Bonnie Blue Flag”, “Marching Through Georgia”, “Dixie”, and “Battle Cry of Freedom” … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Material Culture, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Commentary from the Bookshelves—The Price for Their Pound of Flesh: The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave in the Building of the Nation by Daina Ramey Berry

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Mark Harnitchek… The Price for Their Pound of Flesh puts, front and center, the tension between the internal value of enslaved human souls and their external monetary value as the property of their … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest contributor Adam Burke…[see Part I here] Slavery’s effects on Southern industry and manufacturing devastated the Confederacy’s military manpower capacity. The antebellum North enjoyed dramatic economic and population expansion. From 1840 to 1850, population growth … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Economics, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part I

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest contributor Adam Burke… Tucked into the nook of a large brick building in historic Harpers Ferry is a conspicuous granite monolith. It stands along Potomac Street, a lesser traveled street one block … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Economics, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 47 Comments