Tag Archives: Grant

Wilderness and Ward and Ulysses S. Grant

At the end of April 1885, Ulysses S. Grant knew he was dying. In fact, he had almost died earlier that month. Throat cancer ravaged him, and in late March, his condition collapsed so severely that it nearly killed him. … Continue reading

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The Last Victory of the Army of Northern Virginia –The Battle of Cumberland Church, April 7, 1865

The afternoon of April 7th found the Confederate army in a bad situation. With the losses at Sailors Creek the day before, Lee could barely count 30,000 men left in his army. Most of these men were tired, underfed and … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

“General Grant had us completely in a trap…” Farmville and High Bridge, April 7, 1865

On the afternoon of April 7, Lt. Gen. US Grant entered the town of Farmville.  As one private put it “stores were shut up, houses closed, frightened women peeped through dilapidated doorways and sullen men lolled about the porches.” The Federals … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

“The only chance the Army of Northern Virginia had to save itself” – Jetersville, April 5, 1865

On the morning of April 5th, Maj. Gen. William Pendleton set out to destroy the artillery surplus munitions and cannon of the Army of Northern Virginia. The artillery supplies were sent to Amelia Courthouse from Richmond earlier that spring. Now … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Cavalry, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Grant the Butcher?

Although saddled with the reputation of “Grant the Butcher,” Ulysses S. Grant was hardly unmoved by the butchery around him. An incident in the Wilderness, relayed by Grant’s chief of staff, John Rawlins, to biographer James Wilson (Federal cavalryman and … Continue reading

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Top 15 Posts of 2013—Number 10: Fateful Lightning: Was Sherman’s March To the Sea a War Crime? Part I

You might as well appeal against the thunder-storm as against these terrible hardships of war. They are inevitable, and the only way the people of Atlanta can hope once more to live in peace and quiet at home, is to stop the war, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Civilian, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Personalities, Politics, Sieges, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

No NPS? No Problem!—The Trevilian Station Battlefield

Day Two in a series coinciding with the federal government shutdown The Trevilian Station Battlefield is located in Lousia County, Virginia. Although only a two-day battle, the engagement was part of a larger operation that entailed three major objectvies. After being stalemated by … Continue reading

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Fateful Lightning: Was Sherman’s March To the Sea a War Crime? Part I

You might as well appeal against the thunder-storm as against these terrible hardships of war. They are inevitable, and the only way the people of Atlanta can hope once more to live in peace and quiet at home, is to stop the war, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Civilian, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Personalities, Politics, Sieges, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Ulysses S. Grant’s Long Road from Donelson to Lowell

February 15, 1862 found Ulysses S. Grant sitting on horseback in the snow, staring at the collapsed line along his right. Confederates had pushed out from Ft. Donelson early that morning, while Grant had been downriver talking to Admiral Andrew … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Leadership--Federal, National Park Service, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments