Tag Archives: historiography

Book Review: Slavery: Interpreting American History

In Slavery: Interpreting American History, editors Aaron Astor and Thomas C. Buchanan have compiled an impressive volume that succinctly explores the changing interpretations of slavery. This is not so much a history of American slavery as it is a history … Continue reading

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Book Review: Southern Strategies

Southern Strategies: Why the Confederacy Failed Edited by Christian B. Keller University Press of Kansas   2021   $34.95 Reviewed by Stephen Davis Speculation on why the South lost its war for independence goes back a long time.

Posted in Book Review, Leadership--Confederate | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

A Reflection on Historians and Word Choice

Words have meaning. Historical interpreters, whether guiding battlefield tours, designing museums, or writing articles or books, must carefully choose words that both convey a point and do justice to the topic. Poorly chosen words can impact the effect of a … Continue reading

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Book Review –Getting Right with Lincoln: Correcting Misconceptions about Our Greatest President

Getting Right with Lincoln: Correcting Misconceptions about Our Greatest President By Edward Steers University Press of Kentucky, 2021, $27.95 hardcover Reviewed by Richard G. Frederick Lincoln historiography has been awash with controversy for the last 150 years.  Disagreements over his … Continue reading

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What We’ve Learned: A Podcast Conversation

In a chat recorded in December 2020, Chris Mackowski, Cecily Nelson Zander, Kevin Pawlak, and Sarah Kay Bierle discussed reflections on the last ten year in personal exploration of history and changes in the history field. From the beginning of … Continue reading

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Biography: No Longer the Stepchild of Civil War History

For much of the twentieth century, biography was a genre ignored or demeaned by many academic historians. Traditional cradle-to-grave biographies focused on the so-called “great men of history.” They consigned women, immigrants, people of color, and lesser known figures to … Continue reading

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Some Thoughts on the Status of the Lost Cause

The Lost Cause was at first a subject of scholarly inquiry. It then became one of scorn, used at times as a slur. For a serious student of the war, it is a label few desire as its mythology has … Continue reading

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Gaines Foster and David Blight: Two Views on the Lost Cause

In 1961 the nation celebrated the centennial of the American Civil War with a glorification of battlefield heroics entwined within a narrative of a nation reforged in the fires of war. However, Robert Penn Warren critiqued this vision with The … Continue reading

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Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Dwight Hughes

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. The Civil War … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Longstreet Goes West: Conclusions

James Longstreet’s time in the Western Theater has by and large, not garnered accolades. The prevailing western-centric view casts him as a haughty eastern interloper, come to further his own ambitions at Bragg’s expense. Historians of a more eastern bent … Continue reading

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