Tag Archives: Lost Cause

Public and Private Recollections of Confederate General Edward Porter Alexander

ECW welcomes back guest author Abbi Smithmyer Nearly fifty years after the conclusion of the American Civil War, Edward Porter Alexander’s book Military Memoirs of a Confederate became available to the public. Alexander’s opening remarks begin with the following passage: … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Some Thoughts on the Status of the Lost Cause

The Lost Cause was at first a subject of scholarly inquiry. It then became one of scorn, used at times as a slur. For a serious student of the war, it is a label few desire as its mythology has … Continue reading

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Writing About History in a Manichean Age

Given current events, I find myself asking how one will be able to write about the American Civil War now and in the future. This question has been brewing in my mind since 2015 when the debate over statues began … Continue reading

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Aunt Jemima and the Lost Cause

Quaker Oats has just announced they will retire the Aunt Jemima brand name and imagery. The ready-made, self-rising pancake mix got its start in 1889 at the Pearl Milling Company in St. Joseph, Missouri. The initial owners soon went bankrupt … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Memory, Personalities, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Gaines Foster and David Blight: Two Views on the Lost Cause

In 1961 the nation celebrated the centennial of the American Civil War with a glorification of battlefield heroics entwined within a narrative of a nation reforged in the fires of war. However, Robert Penn Warren critiqued this vision with The … Continue reading

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The Hero & The Ghost: An Account of a Divided Family

ECW welcomes David T. Dixon When the Civil War splits a Georgia family, a returning veteran secures his legacy and helps to bury shameful secrets for future generations… Connor Wright remembered that he was eleven years old when he watched … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

A Conversation with John Coski (conclusion)

Part six of six I’ve been talking with John Coski, historian at the American Civil War Museum and recipient of the 2019 Emerging Civil War Award for Service in Civil War Public History. As we wrap up our conversation today, … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Monuments, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Conversation with John Coski (part two)

Part two of six I’m talking this week with John Coski, historian with the American Civil War Museum in Richmond and recipient of ECW’s 2019 Emerging Civil War Award for Service in Public History. In recounting his “origin story” yesterday, … Continue reading

Posted in Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Heyward Shepherd Memorialized (Sort Of)

On one hand, it’s fitting that a monument commemorates Heywood Shepherd. A night watchman at Harpers Ferry, Shepherd stumbled across John Brown’s raiders on the night of October 16, 1859. They called to Shepherd to surrender, but he refused, and … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

Do We Still Care About the Civil War: Dwight Hughes

The cover story of the newest issue of Civil War Times asks, “Do we still care about the Civil War?” ECW is pleased to partner with Civil War Times to extend the conversation here on the blog. The Civil War … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , | 8 Comments