Tag Archives: Lost Cause

The (Limited) Destruction of Atlanta

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome W. Todd Groce, Ph.D., president and C.E.O. of the Georgia Historical Society, based in Savannah. Todd was kind enough to share with us a little treasure from the GHS’s incredible collection. This morning … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Photography, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , | 20 Comments

Book Review: Ends of War: The Unfinished Fight of Lee’s Army after Appomattox

Caroline Janney is a rising star in the literature of Confederate war-memory. At UVA she wrote her dissertation, “The Ladies Memorial Associations of Virginia” under Gary Gallagher. She drew from it for an essay in Peter Wallenstein and Bertram Wyatt-Brown, … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Supposed Enigma of Isidore Francois Turgis

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin was not just a hit in America, but also in France. After its publication slavery was considered a blight on history, at least in France’s liberal circles. Among those affected was Isidore Francois Turgis, … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Civilian, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Echoes of Reconstruction: Black History Month and the Erasure of Black History

ECW is pleased to welcome back Patrick Young, author of The Reconstruction Era blog I remember taking my kids to visit Stone Mountain in Georgia around 1991. At the time, the “park” was a sort of Confederate Disneyland that mixed faux Civil … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

MLK on How the Dunning School Distorted the Echoes of Reconstruction

ECW is pleased to welcome back Patrick Young, author of The Reconstruction Era blog Martin Luther King  delivered a speech in 1968 at Carnegie Hall in New York to commemorate the 100th Birthday of W.E.B. DuBois. In his speech, King spoke about … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Reconstruction | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments

The “Emerging Civil War Series” Series: Don’t Give an Inch

When it came to writing Don’t Give an Inch, I was very excited to put pen to paper but, at the same time, I’m not going to lie: I was a little bit nervous. We decided to break up the … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War Series | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Echoes of the Lost Cause: Autumn of the Lost Cause

ECW is pleased to welcome back Patrick Young, author of The Reconstruction Era blog The last month has been one of dislocation for those of us devoted to studying the Civil War and Reconstruction.  Nathan Bedford Forrest was literally relocated, or at … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments, Reconstruction, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Antietam’s Lower Field Revisited Part IV: A.P. Hill’s Not-So-Devastating Counterattack

One of the most celebrated episodes of the entire war is the nick of time arrival of General A.P. Hill’s division to save the day for the Confederates at Antietam. In a made for Hollywood type of moment, the Confederate … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest contributor Adam Burke…[see Part I here] Slavery’s effects on Southern industry and manufacturing devastated the Confederacy’s military manpower capacity. The antebellum North enjoyed dramatic economic and population expansion. From 1840 to 1850, population growth … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Economics, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , | 18 Comments

The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part I

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest contributor Adam Burke… Tucked into the nook of a large brick building in historic Harpers Ferry is a conspicuous granite monolith. It stands along Potomac Street, a lesser traveled street one block … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Economics, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 47 Comments