Tag Archives: Newspapers

The Post-Shiloh Musings of General Sherman

There is little doubt that the Battle of Shiloh, April 6-7, 1862, changed not only the nature of the American Civil War, but also the trajectory of William Tecumseh Sherman’s career.  Going into the battle Sherman was working diligently to … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

On The Eve Of War: Atlanta, Georgia

“A slight perceptible odor of Yankeedom.” This is how someone characterized Atlanta at the time of the war. The disparagement reflected the bustling business air about the city: clanking railroad cars, up-and-coming factories, thriving commercial center with plenty of merchants, … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Newspapers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

“‘Tis folly to say the people must have news”: Sherman, the Press, and Our Own Culpability

In a Feb. 18, 1863, letter to his brother, Sen. John Sherman of Ohio, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman lamented what he saw as a deterioration of American ideals. In order to defeat the Confederacy, he feared that the United … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , | 7 Comments

“A Central Figure of Transcendingly Absorbing Interest”: The Wilkesons at Gettysburg

ECW welcomes guest author Evan Portman On July 1st, 1863,  nineteen-year-old Bayard Wilkeson and his men of Battery G, 4th U.S. Artillery arrived in Gettysburg after a twelve-mile march from Emmitsburg, Maryland. The descendent of a prominent New York family, … Continue reading

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Question of the Week: 2/1-2/7/21

What’s your favorite Civil War account in a newspaper? (1860’s or veterans’ writings) Does it seem accurate or is it the inaccuracies that make it a favorite?

Posted in Newspapers, Question of the Week | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Robin Hood & The Civil War: A Child’s Game? (Part 4)

Check this out! A set of children’s playing cards from the Civil War era, preserved by The Valentine Museum in Richmond. I own a debt of gratitude to fellow ECW member Bert Dunkerly for helping me track the artifact photos … Continue reading

Posted in Material Culture, Newspapers | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

I’m Studying The Civil War…Which Century?

Help! I’ve spent more time looking at 20th Century sources this last weekend than 19th Century sources. But I haven’t actually left Civil War studies and eloped with another war. To explain more properly, I’m looking at Civil War memory. … Continue reading

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Richmond Reports on General Stuart’s Ride Around McClellan

One of our editors was poking around Newspapers.com the other evening and stumbled across announcements of Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart’s famous (or infamous) ride around McClelland during the Peninsula Campaign. Occurring between June 12 and 15, 1862, the ride gathered … Continue reading

Posted in Cavalry, Material Culture, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Primary Sources: The National Tribune

One of my very favorite primary sources is The National Tribune. The Trib began as a monthly newspaper intended for Union veterans of the Civil War, and was published monthly until 1881. Beginning in 1881, it was published weekly, and continued to be … Continue reading

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Draft Dilemma in Poweshiek County: The Murder of the Marshals

Emerging Civil War welcomes guest author David Connon Amid mounting Union Army death counts in summer 1864, Iowa had its first draft. Three men didn’t report for duty on October 1, so the provost marshal in Grinnell sent two deputy … Continue reading

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