Tag Archives: Petersburg Campaign

Stolen Pie, but a Bigger Prize for Sergeant Young at Petersburg

Today is the favorite holiday for math teachers. March Fourteenth (3-14) represents the first three numbers in the mathematical constant pi. I’ve been using pi (3.14159…) a lot more than I had anticipated as a historian. Each time I rescale … Continue reading

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Celebrate the Expected Capture of Richmond with a New Stove!

I found this humorous newspaper article while searching through historic Vermont newspapers. Burlington entrepreneur J.B. Wardell hoped to cash in on the public’s joy at what he anticipated to be the end of the Civil War by attaching that jubilation … Continue reading

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Identifying “Courier Kirkpatrick” on A.P. Hill’s Last Ride

Lieutenant General Ambrose Powell Hill was killed in the aftermath of the successful Union attack near Petersburg on the morning of April 2, 1865. Sergeant George Washington Tucker, Jr., the general’s chief of couriers, was the only Confederate present at … Continue reading

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“Shoot and Be Damned”: Lawrence Berry at Fort Gregg

For a few early afternoon hours on April 2, 1865, three hundred Mississippi infantrymen and a pair of gun crews from the Washington Artillery of New Orleans clung to Fort Gregg as they held back two full XXIV Corps divisions. … Continue reading

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Struck by a Fired Ramrod, Part 2: Mysterious Death and Elaborate Funeral

This is part two of a three-part series. Part one can be found here. Major William Ellis returned to the Army of the Potomac near Petersburg in mid-June. He knowingly cut short his recovery from a gruesome wound received from … Continue reading

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Nelson Miles and the Bayonet in 1865

Prevailing opinion today suggests that a war that began in 1861 as one of bayonets and bravado on open battlefields transformed into trenches, firepower, and raids on supply by 1865. Frontal attacks had become a thing of the past and … Continue reading

Posted in Arms & Armaments, Battles, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Book Review: “On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864”

I’m not a fan of writing traditional book reviews. I suppose it reminds me too much of my standard weekly assignments during all four undergrad years as a history major at the University of Illinois. Gordon Rhea’s latest publication, On … Continue reading

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Why I “Do” History

About a month ago a friend of mine pointed me to an entry-level priced CDV of a veteran of the 100th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, my ancestor’s unit. I have spent quite a bit of time contemplating whether or not I … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Material Culture, Medical, Memory, Monuments, Photography, Preservation, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Mapping the Petersburg Campaign: Sutherland Station

I have come to believe that the primary reason why Petersburg is an often overlooked campaign in the scope of the Civil War is the challenge of understanding its nine and a half month progression. There is no shortage of … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Photography | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Like Sheep

The use of cliché is prevalent in Civil War combat narratives. Every attacking force, by their description, always had to charge through “a hail of grape and canister.” This was repeated ad nauseam regardless of whether or not there was … Continue reading

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