Tag Archives: poetry

Grant Memorial Poem: “Our Dead General”

Our final Grant memorial poem from the Albany Evening Journal comes from August 4, 1885. The original poem appeared on page 3 of the paper, written by someone using the pen name “Fidelitas.” The pen name—derived from the Latin, meaning … Continue reading

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Grant Memorial Poetry: “Grant”

Today’s Grant memorial poem comes from the August 4, 1885, edition of the Albany Evening Journal, where it appeared on page 2. Written the previous day as an original piece for the paper, the poem ponders the nature of greatness. … Continue reading

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Grant Memorial Poetry: “Let Us Have Peace”

When Ulysses S. Grant arrived on Mt. McGregor on June 16, 1885, for what would be the last six weeks of his life, the regional newspaper, the Albany Evening Journal, provided extensive daily coverage. One of the world’s biggest stories … Continue reading

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The Saltpetre Poems

Students and devotees of the great Emory Professor Bell I. Wiley are very familiar with The Bell Irvin Wiley Reader, edited by Hill Jordan, James I. Robertson, Jr., and J. H. Segars (LSU Press, 2001).   Researching for the book, Mr. … Continue reading

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Longfellow, the “Organ of Muskets,” and the Civil War

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest author Rob Wilson ECW’s December 24 re-posting of Meg Groeling thoughtful piece about Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s 1863 poem “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” was, for me, a welcome introduction to the work. No … Continue reading

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Remembering the Flag Raising Over Fort Sumter

By Julie Mujic Residents of Waukesha, Wisconsin, celebrated Lee’s surrender on the evening of April 9, 1865, along with the rest of the North. The long war was ending and their loved ones might finally return home. Despite their distance from … Continue reading

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Remember

Tuesday is Veteran’s Day, and the difference between Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day is one of mortality. Veteran’s Day honors those serving, and living veterans. Memorial Day, a day of remembrance for those who gave their last, full measure, has … Continue reading

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A Little Poetry

Sometimes in the middle of all the carnage, a little poetry helps to clear one’s vision. After all, the American Civil War was about some pretty defining things, a few of which are still undergoing examination.

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To Fight Aloud is Very Brave

On the heels of Chris’s recent series on Civil War-related literature, we thought we’d pass along a link sent to us about a new book, To Fight Aloud is Very Brave by Faith Barrett. Barrett argues “a broad range of … Continue reading

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