Tag Archives: slavery

“What Shall Be Done with the Slave?” The 9th Illinois Cavalry and Practical Emancipation

I am frequently sidetracked when scanning through historic newspapers on a quest for specific information. What can I say, the headlines are still doing their job. Such was the case while digitally flipping through August 1862 issues of the Chicago … Continue reading

Posted in Cavalry, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Congressman Wheeler Speaks in the House on Causes of the War

Jack Melton, publisher of Civil War News, often talks with me about little-known sources and items in Civil War history. Recently he pointed me to one such: a speech by Joseph Wheeler, later Confederate major general, then U. S. Representative … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Newspapers, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

February 27, 1860: Lincoln at Cooper Union

On this day 158 years ago-February 27, 1860-Abraham Lincoln of Illinois delivered an invited speech at the Cooper Institute in New York City. Lincoln had gained a reputation and a following among some Republicans in 1858 when he skillfully debated … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Personalities, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Thinking About These Photographs

Compared to the number of Civil War photographs of soldiers, civilians, camps, and battlefields, posed photos of horses are rare. Clicking through Library of Congress’s online archives, though, I found some real photographic gems in this category. Looking closer at … Continue reading

Posted in Photography, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Charles Dickens, America, & The Civil War

If you look at lists or letters or diaries mentioning reading material from the mid-19th Century in America, you’ll likely find a book or two by British author Charles Dickens – if that reader enjoyed novels. Popular on both sides … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Emancipation Proclamation: An International Turning Point

In  his post “Thenceforward and Forever Free”: The Emancipation Proclamation as a Turning Point, Dan Vermilya makes a good case that the president’s executive action was a turning point of the war because it clarified Union war aims on the issue of … Continue reading

Posted in Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Turning Point: Assault on Battery Wagner by the 54th Massachusetts

Around a small hamlet in southern Pennsylvania, Robert E. Lee’s vaunted Army of Northern Virginia was stymied and driven back after three days, July 1st through the 3rd, of bloodletting at the Battle of Gettysburg. A turning point in the … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Common Soldier, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Monuments, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

“Thenceforward and Forever Free”: The Emancipation Proclamation as a Turning Point

We are pleased to welcome Dan Vermilya, author of the upcoming Emerging Civil war Series book That Field of Blood: The Battle of Antietam. Dan, a historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, is also a licensed battlefield guide at Antietam … Continue reading

Posted in Engaging the Civil War Series, Lincoln, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

JFK at Antietam

One of the things I love about revisiting a battlefield is to see what jumps out at me this time. Each visit has the opportunity to bring something new if I remain open to it. Such was the case during … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

A Monumental Discussion: Sarah Kay Bierle

Ever played the ice-breaker game “Two Truths & A Lie?” The concept is that everyone makes three statements (usually about themselves) and the others have to guess which are true and which is a lie. Now, let’s be clear, I … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Memory, Monuments | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments