Tag Archives: Slavery

The Secession of Mississippi

January 9, 2020, is the 160th anniversary of the secession of Mississippi Named for war hero Andrew Jackson, Jackson, Mississippi, was founded in 1821 at the intersection of the Natchez Trace and the Pearl River. Jackson himself had come through … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Antebellum South, Economics, Politics, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

John Wolcott Phelps’ Emancipation Proclamation

The voyage of the U.S. Frigate Constitution ended at Ship island, a barrier island off the Gulf coast of Mississippi in December, 1861. Prior to disembarking, Brigadier General John Wolcott Phelps gathered all passengers on deck and recited one of … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

What We’ve Learned: Still A Lot of Work to Do

It seems kind of surreal that ten years have already passed since the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. As we lace up our skates to embark on the 160th cycle, as it were, it’s a good question to ask: … Continue reading

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Finding Missouri Governor and Union Brigadier General Thomas C. Fletcher in Hillsboro

For many history buffs and road trippers, rural Jefferson County, Missouri is usually not very high – or maybe not at all – on the Civil War bucket list of sites to see. Sitting due south of St. Louis is … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

When a Monument Cherrypicks Its History

When people have the chance to learn about history, don’t we want that history to be factually correct? That’s the question I asked last week when writing about the Robert E. Lee statue at Antietam. Placed at a spot on … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Monuments, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 177 Comments

A Doctor, His Enslaved Man, and Georgia’s Union Circle (part two)

The devastation and upheaval created in the neighborhood near the Battle at Resaca gave people like Dr. Gideon’s enslaved man, Owen, their first viable opportunity to aid the Union cause. Owen Gideon was born into slavery about 1834 in Hall … Continue reading

Posted in Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

A Doctor, His Enslaved Man, and North Georgia’s Union Circle (part one)

Dr. Berry Gideon, his wife, and seven daughters watched helplessly as flames devoured their home next to the Western and Atlantic Railroad, between the towns of Calhoun and Resaca, on June 18, 1864. Union soldiers allowed the family fifteen minutes … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Common Soldier, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Remembering Franklin 2020

Today, November 30, is the anniversary of the 1864 battle of Franklin. When I visited the battlefield in September, I was struck by this sign outside Carnton Plantation. It serves as an invitation to all of us, as students of … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

Patriotic Covers and Northern Attitudes about Slavery

ECW welcomes back guest author Leon Reed Patriotic envelopes (also known as covers) provide important insights into public opinion in the Civil War. These envelopes were made for profit by commercial printers, who would have carefully tracked what was selling … Continue reading

Posted in Material Culture, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

“To Laugh in One Hand And Cry in the Other”: W.B. Higginbotham & the Black Community in Civil War Rome

ECW welcomes back David T. Dixon Wm. Higginbotham, a well-known free man of color, also returned on Saturday morning. He reached Manassas on the morning of the battle, but was denied the privilege of taking a gun and falling into … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments