Tag Archives: Theodore Lyman

A View of the Heavens

Last week, I shared an account from Theodore Lyman, a member of George Gordon Meade’s staff. One of the things I enjoy about Lyman’s writing is that he’s an excellent stylist. His writing is colorful and evocative. Take, for example, … Continue reading

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“Lie still and lie still”

Back in June, I shared an account from a Confederate soldier in the Vicksburg trenches who complained about being bored. Recently, while doing some reading about the Mine Run Campaign, I came across an account from Theodore Lyman, a member … Continue reading

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Tuesday on the Trail

Tuesday started out as many days ‘on the Trail.’ I was up and out early, before sunrise, and under caffeinated I hit the interstate. The podcast I had on wasn’t helping to wake me up and decided that latest Jane’s … Continue reading

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The AoP Settles into Winter Camp, 1863

As the Army of the Potomac settled into its winter quarters around Brandy Station and Culpeper in December 1863, Lt. Col. Theodore Lyman—George Gordon Meade’s aide-de-camp—toured the camps with the Army of the Potomac’s chief of staff, Andrew A. Humphreys. … Continue reading

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Swelling the Ranks for Review

In mid-November 16, 1863, with Army of the Potomac commander George Meade in Washington to consultation with the president and War Department, it fell to VI Corps commander Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick to serve as the army’s temporary commander as it … Continue reading

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Kilpatrick’s Deficiency in Judgment

Theodore Lyman, Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade’s aide-de-camp, offered an interesting observation about part of the Federal cavalry on this date in 1863. The Army of the Potomac was cautiously advancing out of its protected position in Centreville, Virginia, where Robert … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Cavalry, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Book Review: “Grant Under Fire: An Exposé of Generalship & Character in the American Civil War”

Ulysses S. Grant’s service during the Civil War has, for obvious reasons, provided plenty of historiographical fodder to generation after generation of historians. The General-in-Chief’s overall standing certainly passed through its fair share of rungs. Early proponents of the Lost … Continue reading

Posted in Arms & Armaments, Book Review | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

Civil War Witch Hunt: George Gordon Meade, the Retreat from Gettysburg and the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War

Part four in a series In part three of this series, we examined the question of how George G. Meade’s operational orders and the logistical challenges forged by the atrocious weather affected the Army of the Potomac’s pursuit of the … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Cavalry, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

From the ECW Archives: The Union Assault at Cold Harbor June 1, 1864

All through the night of May 31 and into June 1, 1864, Horatio Wright’s VI Corps trudged along the dusty and choked Virginia byroads. They had been pulled from the Union right flank and ordered to march to reinforce and relieve … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Monuments, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Reaction to the Thirteenth Amendment

Yesterday the House passed the amendation to the Constitution forever forbidding slavery on the soil of the United States! It now remains for the President to sign and the States to ratify. This news is unexpected, important and good. 1st. … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Sesquicentennial, Slavery | Tagged , , | 1 Comment