Tag Archives: Thomas Jefferson

Descendants of Revolutionary Riders in the Civil War

Most Americans know the story of Paul Revere and William Dawes and their midnight ride on April 18-19, 1775, through the Massachusetts countryside (Revere’s role is better know than Dawes’). I would wager that most readers of this blog know … Continue reading

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The Secession of Mississippi

January 9, 2020, is the 160th anniversary of the secession of Mississippi Named for war hero Andrew Jackson, Jackson, Mississippi, was founded in 1821 at the intersection of the Natchez Trace and the Pearl River. Jackson himself had come through … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Antebellum South, Economics, Politics, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

What We’ve Learned: Pondering Usable History

If but for a missing license plate, state police might not have caught Timothy McVeigh, or at least not soon after the crime. At 9:02 a.m. on April 19, 1995, McVeigh blew up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Lincoln, Memory, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

BookChat with Lucas Morel, author of Lincoln and the American Founding

I was pleased to spend some time with a recently released book by historian Lucas E. Morel, author of Lincoln and the American Founding, part of the Concise Lincoln Library from Southern Illinois University Press (find out more about it … Continue reading

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Questions of Secession (part four)

part four of five I’ve been chatting about secession lately with historian Nathan Hall of Richmond National Battlefield Park. Nathan has been studying the topic deeply for many years and recently spoke on it at the Richmond Civil War Roundtable. … Continue reading

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Acts of violence against America

Acts of violence against America. That’s the context an exhibit panel challenged me to consider as I neared the end of the self-guided tour of the Sixth Floor Museum in the Texas Book Depository overlooking Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas. … Continue reading

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Outraged about “media bias”? Read a Civil War newspaper.

I don’t know about you, but I’ve heard a lot of people complaining online in recent months about media bias. Regardless of whether they’re on the political left, right, or middle, I hear from so many people convinced that the … Continue reading

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Do You Know George Wythe?

Down the street from the Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg sits a two-story brick structure. Living historians, in first-person, debate the road to the American Revolution. But, who was George Wythe? 

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Remembering John and Abigail (part one)

Part one of two When Abigail Adams died in late October, 1818, her husband, John, brokenhearted, said, “I wish I could lie down beside her and die, too.” Today, the two are entombed side by side, along with their son … Continue reading

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Jefferson: Self-governance and “the field of knowledge”

The final part in a four-part series “The field of knowledge,” said Thomas Jefferson, “is the common prosperity of all mankind.” Jefferson’s words are inscribed in big bold letters in the entryway of Monticello’s visitor center. They’re written in architectural … Continue reading

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