Tag Archives: weekly-whitman

Weekly Whitman: “I Saw Old General at Bay”

This week’s poem is a puzzle of sorts–just who is “old General?” I always thought it was Confederate General Robert E. Lee, but the copy of Whitman’s poems I usually use (Drum Taps: The Complete Civil War Poems) has a … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Weave in, My Hardy Life”

In my work on Colonel Elmer Ellsworth there is a description of the man by John Hay, future Lincoln secretary and Roosevelt Secretary of State. Hay mentions that the picture shows the physical strength and definition of Ellsworth’s upper arm. … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Camps of Green”

I watched the arrival of the soldiers, sailors, and marines who returned from Afghanistan to America in metal containers. President Biden had his hand over his heart, and those in uniform saluted. Dead is still dead, no matter how efficient … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Year That Trembled and Reel’d Beneath Me”

Depending on how one views the American Civil War, this year could be one of many. I always think of it as 1862, the year the war got serious. Not that “before” was any picnic, but the issues with the Peninsula … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: Whitman on Film

Today’s Weekly Whitman will take 32 minutes of your time but is worth every second. It is a collection of movie clips and television shows that somehow included Whitman and his words. It is magical! You will remember the obvious … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Over the Carnage Rose Prophetic a Voice”

“Over the Carnage Rose Prophetic a Voice” appeared for the first time in the 1865 Drum-Taps collection, but many of the poem’s lines had been published in “Calamus” #5 in the 1860 Leaves of Grass. It initially was an upbeat … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim”

Whitman’s “Sight in Camp” is one on the saddest poems Whitman ever wrote. One assumes he is looking at dead Yankees, but we know the same sight could be seen on either side of the war.  Every soldier was someone’s … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: A Postage Stamp

A few weeks ago, I got an email from a Weekly Whitman reader who shall remain nameless because I have lost the email somewhere between my phone and the desktop. He asked me if I had seen the Walt Whitman … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “A March in the Ranks Hard-prest, and the Road Unknown”

This particular poem—“A March in the Ranks Hard-prest, and the Road Unknown”—resonates with me because of the work I have done on First Bull Run and the old Sudley Church. Descriptions given by Arthur O’Neil Alcock, of the 11th New … Continue reading

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Weekly Whitman: “This Dust was Once the Man”

The four lines below are the last entry in Whitman’s Lincoln grouping. They are strangely sorrowful and hopeful at the same time. Although rarely published, it is a fitting tribute to the slain president. Whitman and Lincoln are forever connected … Continue reading

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