Tag Archives: William T. Sherman

“‘Tis folly to say the people must have news”: Sherman, the Press, and Our Own Culpability

In a Feb. 18, 1863, letter to his brother, Sen. John Sherman of Ohio, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman lamented what he saw as a deterioration of American ideals. In order to defeat the Confederacy, he feared that the United … Continue reading

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Sherman’s “Demon Spirit”

In a letter written on April 29, 1863, to his wife Ellen, William T. Sherman privately expressed his misgivings about the Vicksburg campaign Ulysses S. Grant was just then launching. “My own opinion is that this whole plan of attack … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Leadership--Federal | Tagged , , , , , , | 37 Comments

Gen. Sherman Sends Christmas Greetings to His Children

During a break from the scourge of war, Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman penned a Christmas letter to his daughter Maria, whom he affectionately calls “Minnie.” The general and his army were in occupation of Savannah, Georgia, after a long march … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Primary Sources | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Sherman’s Christmas, 1864

I love this image from Leslie’s Illustrated depicting General William Tecumseh Sherman placing the city of Savannah, Georgia, in Uncle Sam’s stocking. Sherman arrived in front of Savannah in December after marching his army across Georgia from Atlanta in an … Continue reading

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Sherman in Savannah . . . Sort of

Before the pandemic shut down the production, a colleague – Tracy Ford – and I traveled the country performing the three-act play Now We Stand by Each Other Always about the friendship between Union generals Ulysses S. Grant and William … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Civil War in Pop Culture, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

The Forlorn Hope at Vicksburg

Google “Forlorn Hope” + “Civil War” and several desperate actions show up. “A forlorn hope,” says the Wikipedia entry, which shows up first, “is a band of soldiers or other combatants chosen to take the vanguard in a military operation, … Continue reading

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Manticores, Myths, and Memory (conclusion)

(Part four of four) Paul Ashdown and Ed Caudill are co-authors of the latest book in the Engaging the Civil War Series, Imagining Wild Bill: James Butler Hickok in War, Media, and Memory (Southern Illinois University Press). Their work on … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Civil War in Pop Culture, Engaging the Civil War Series, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Manticores, Myths, and Memory (part three)

(Part three of four) Paul Ashdown and Ed Caudill are co-authors of the latest book in the Engaging the Civil War Series, Imagining Wild Bill: James Butler Hickok in War, Media, and Memory (Southern Illinois University Press). Yesterday, they explained their … Continue reading

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Manticores, Myths, and Memory (part two)

(Part two of four) Paul Ashdown and Ed Caudill are co-authors of the latest book in the Engaging the Civil War Series, Imagining Wild Bill: James Butler Hickok in War, Media, and Memory (Southern Illinois University Press). In yesterday’s opening … Continue reading

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Manticores, Myths, and Memory (part one)

(Part one of four) Paul Ashdown and Ed Caudill are co-authors of the latest book in the Engaging the Civil War Series, Imagining Wild Bill: James Butler Hickok in War, Media, and Memory (Southern Illinois University Press). In this series, … Continue reading

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