Category Archives: Slavery

The Port Royal Experiment-Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 4

Conclusion to the Port Royal Experiment series.   Despite the preparation, the enthusiasm, and the progress of the Gideonites based in Port Royal, South Carolina, the government had separate ideas for how Reconstruction should be structured. Educationally, the experiment was … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The Port Royal Experiment – Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 3

Because of Edward Pierce’s thorough report on the African American population in Port Royal, South Carolina, and his success with the growing contraband population at Fort Monroe, in Hampton, Virginia, President Lincoln and Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase quickly … Continue reading

Posted in Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment—Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part Two

This is part two in a series. Edward Pierce, an agent to the Federal Government sent to visit Port Royal and the surrounding islands of South Carolina, wrote an in depth anthropological style report on the African American population abandoned … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment – Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part One

In late October of 1861, the Union Naval fleet set sail for Port Royal, South Carolina, hoping to advance Winfield Scott’s plan to blockade the Confederate ports and prevent trade with European countries. Similar to the Chesapeake Bay, Port Royal … Continue reading

Posted in Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Day Four: The Stream of American History

Part eleven in a series Because Dan is working on a book about Corinth, for the Emerging Civil War Series, the town is a “must” on our tour. While I’ll help him grab some photos for the book, my main … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Origins of Memorial Day

Today as we take a moment to reflect upon those American veterans that gave “their last full measure of devotion,” at the same time we also honor the earliest origins of this day. Discover how newly-freed African-Americans honored Union war … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Memory, Monuments, Photography, Sesquicentennial, Slavery | 2 Comments

Interpretation vs Stewardship: A Conundrum at the Jackson Shrine

Death Day at the Stonewall Jackson Shrine—May 10—always brings out some colorful characters, which is one of the reasons I enjoy working there so much on the anniversary of Jackson’s death. This year it was no different. A fellow showed … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Millard Fillmore’s Position on Slavery Still Causing Controversy in His Hometown

by ECW Correspondent Liam McGurl The Fugitive Slave Act is still causing a stir 165 years after it was passed—at least in Buffalo, NY. It is likely that anyone who has been to the city has noticed a commonality among … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Patriotic Booth? “Misguided…Ignorant”

ECW is pleased to offer a guest commentary from historian and SCV member Chuck Young. April 14, 2015 marked the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth. While thousands of Americans marked this occasion … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, lincoln, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Question of the Week: February 2, 2015

Saturday, January 31 marked the 150th anniversary of the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, abolishing slavery. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth would grant former slaves citizenship and give them the right to vote. I have called the Thirteenth Amendment “arguably the … Continue reading

Posted in Question of the Week, Slavery | Tagged , , | 8 Comments