Category Archives: Slavery

Ed Bonekemper’s Lost Cause Fact-Check (part two)

Part two of two During his adventures traveling the country, talking to Civil War groups, Edward Bonekemper III kept encountering the same Lost Cause quandary. “I continued to speak to well-informed groups of people and was surprised by the great … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ed Bonekemper’s Lost Cause Fact-Check (part one)

Part one of two Historians debunked the myth of the Lost Cause decades ago, but it still defines the way many (if not most) Americans remember the narrative of the Civil War. Its influence on popular imagination holds sway over … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Confederate Flag: In Discussion and Bikini

I don’t have occasion to talk about the Civil War on my own campus very often, so I was delighted a couple weeks ago to be invited to serve on a faculty panel to discuss the Confederate battle flag. I … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments

Sailors, Slaves, and Henry P. Moore

While doing some research for an upcoming post, I came across several photographs by Henry P. Moore, a New Hampshire artist who traveled to South Carolina in 1862. Like many of his colleagues, Moore capitalized on the outbreak of the … Continue reading

Posted in Navies, Photography, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Question of the Week: “The Civil War” by Ken Burns, 25 Years Later

As I sat last night and watched the re-released historic documentary by Ken Burns, I was taken back to 1990.  At that time I was in the 8th grade and had an interest in history.  I can remember distinctly watching … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Arms & Armaments, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, lincoln, Memory, National Park Service, Newspapers, Personalities, Question of the Week, Slavery | 9 Comments

“They Fought Because They Would Not Be Slaves”

Revolutionary War Wednesday and Emerging Revolutionary War is pleased to welcome guest historian Mark Maloy this week.  African-Americans fought for the Americans during the Revolutionary War, right?  Many of us remember learning about Crispus Attucks dying during the Boston Massacre … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Memory, National Park Service, Revolutionary War, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Confederate Culture Wars: Sam Smith

This week, ECW historians are offering their thoughts and reactions to recent events related to Confederate memory. Next up: Sam Smith If we as Americans lose the memory of the war as a refounding of the republic, and replace it … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Meaning No Disrespect . . .

The removal of South Carolina’s Confederate battle flag from the grounds of the Statehouse on Friday (7/10/2015) caused quite a kerfluffle, for many reasons.

Posted in Armies, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Monuments, National Park Service, Politics, Preservation, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Who Won the Sesquicentennial?

Just as the last reenactment ink was dry on the last reenactment surrender, all heck seemed to break loose across the nation: police were accused of killing black men–young and old, the Confederate Southern Cross ignited fear and loathing, and … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Medical, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Question of the Week, Reconstruction, Sesquicentennial, Slavery, Symposium, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment-Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 4

Conclusion to the Port Royal Experiment series.   Despite the preparation, the enthusiasm, and the progress of the Gideonites based in Port Royal, South Carolina, the government had separate ideas for how Reconstruction should be structured. Educationally, the experiment was … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment