Category Archives: Slavery

“They Fought Because They Would Not Be Slaves”

Revolutionary War Wednesday and Emerging Revolutionary War is pleased to welcome guest historian Mark Maloy this week.  African-Americans fought for the Americans during the Revolutionary War, right?  Many of us remember learning about Crispus Attucks dying during the Boston Massacre … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Memory, National Park Service, Revolutionary War, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Confederate Culture Wars: Sam Smith

This week, ECW historians are offering their thoughts and reactions to recent events related to Confederate memory. Next up: Sam Smith If we as Americans lose the memory of the war as a refounding of the republic, and replace it … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Meaning No Disrespect . . .

The removal of South Carolina’s Confederate battle flag from the grounds of the Statehouse on Friday (7/10/2015) caused quite a kerfluffle, for many reasons.

Posted in Armies, Campaigns, Common Soldier, Leadership--Confederate, Memory, Monuments, National Park Service, Politics, Preservation, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Who Won the Sesquicentennial?

Just as the last reenactment ink was dry on the last reenactment surrender, all heck seemed to break loose across the nation: police were accused of killing black men–young and old, the Confederate Southern Cross ignited fear and loathing, and … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Books & Authors, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Medical, Memory, Monuments, Personalities, Politics, Question of the Week, Reconstruction, Sesquicentennial, Slavery, Symposium, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment-Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 4

Conclusion to the Port Royal Experiment series.   Despite the preparation, the enthusiasm, and the progress of the Gideonites based in Port Royal, South Carolina, the government had separate ideas for how Reconstruction should be structured. Educationally, the experiment was … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The Port Royal Experiment – Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 3

Because of Edward Pierce’s thorough report on the African American population in Port Royal, South Carolina, and his success with the growing contraband population at Fort Monroe, in Hampton, Virginia, President Lincoln and Secretary of the Treasury Salmon Chase quickly … Continue reading

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The Port Royal Experiment—Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part Two

This is part two in a series. Edward Pierce, an agent to the Federal Government sent to visit Port Royal and the surrounding islands of South Carolina, wrote an in depth anthropological style report on the African American population abandoned … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment – Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part One

In late October of 1861, the Union Naval fleet set sail for Port Royal, South Carolina, hoping to advance Winfield Scott’s plan to blockade the Confederate ports and prevent trade with European countries. Similar to the Chesapeake Bay, Port Royal … Continue reading

Posted in Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Day Four: The Stream of American History

Part eleven in a series Because Dan is working on a book about Corinth, for the Emerging Civil War Series, the town is a “must” on our tour. While I’ll help him grab some photos for the book, my main … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Origins of Memorial Day

Today as we take a moment to reflect upon those American veterans that gave “their last full measure of devotion,” at the same time we also honor the earliest origins of this day. Discover how newly-freed African-Americans honored Union war … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Memory, Monuments, Photography, Sesquicentennial, Slavery | 2 Comments