Category Archives: Slavery

Charles Dickens, America, & The Civil War

If you look at lists or letters or diaries mentioning reading material from the mid-19th Century in America, you’ll likely find a book or two by British author Charles Dickens – if that reader enjoyed novels. Popular on both sides … Continue reading

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From ECW’s Archives: Port Royal Experiment

In 2015, Ashley Webb wrote a four part series for Emerging Civil War, discussing the Port Royal Experiment as a prelude to the Reconstruction. We thought it was a series to revisit during 2018 Black History Month.

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Book Review: “The Limits of Loyalty: Ordinary People in Civil War Mississippi”

Easy as it is to imagine the Confederacy made up of a solid group of Union-hating slave owners and their friends, the reality of the situation is much more complex. Jarrett Ruminski, a freelance writer, researcher, and consultant, investigates this … Continue reading

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Prince Greer: Slave, Freedman, and Entrepreneur

One of the issues facing newly freed men and women was how to make a living in a world that had never paid them a living wage for their contributions. Even the USCT initially were paid less than white soldiers, … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Holidays, Medical, Memory, Personalities, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

From ECW’s Archives – Black Confederates: Laborers or Soldiers?

In 2016, Emerging Civil War author Steward T. Henderson wrote a five part series, sharing his research about Black Confederates. Were they soldiers or laborers? We thought it was a discussion to revisit during 2018 Black History Month.

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Bernard Slave Cabins

A new article by guest author Michael Aubrecht One of the more overlooked spots on the Fredericksburg National Battlefield is the Bernard Slave Cabins. This area was the homestead of a number of enslaved African-Americans and a focal point of … Continue reading

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Not the Same African Americans We Always See

I was watching a television show a couple of weeks ago, and the subject of Black History Month was mentioned. One of the characters complained that America always trots out the same four African Americans every year to stand in … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Common Soldier, Memory, Personalities, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

The Emancipation Proclamation: An International Turning Point

In  his post “Thenceforward and Forever Free”: The Emancipation Proclamation as a Turning Point, Dan Vermilya makes a good case that the president’s executive action was a turning point of the war because it clarified Union war aims on the issue of … Continue reading

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The Homestead Act, Early Republicans, and the Coming of the Civil War

Nearly everyone knows that the Emancipation Proclamation became effective on January 1, 1863.  This document formally established abolition of slavery as one of the Union’s goals in fighting and winning the Civil War and enabled the North to recruit African … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Emerging Civil War, Lincoln, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 17 Comments

War Comes to St. George’s (part four)

(part four in a series) After the battle of Fredericksburg and before the battle of Chancellorsville, the Confederate army used St. George’s for services and revivals. J. William Jones reported in his memoir Christ in the Camp that revivals were … Continue reading

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