Author Archives: Jon Tracey

ECW Weekender: National Museum of the United States Army

Today’s ECW Weekender highlights a new museum that most of our readers have yet to see. Originally set to open in June 2020, COVID-19 delayed the National Museum of the United States Army’s plan. It opened on November 11 that … Continue reading

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The Appomattox (or Shenandoah) Parole Passes and Confederate Cavalry After Appomattox

Following the combat at Appomattox Court House on the morning of April 9, Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia prepared to surrender. Lee and Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant met in the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s … Continue reading

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Book Review: On Juneteenth

On Juneteenth  By Annette Gordon-Reed Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2021, $15.95 Reviewed by Jon Tracey Thanks to current discussions of inequality and increased reflection on the past, Juneteenth has grown from a Texas tradition to one that has garnered attention across … Continue reading

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A Reflection on Historians and Word Choice

Words have meaning. Historical interpreters, whether guiding battlefield tours, designing museums, or writing articles or books, must carefully choose words that both convey a point and do justice to the topic. Poorly chosen words can impact the effect of a … Continue reading

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Recruiting the Regiment: York County and the 130th Pennsylvania Infantry

In previous blog posts, I explored the service of the 130th Pennsylvania Infantry at Antietam as well as at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. In this post, part of ECW’s larger “Recruiting the Regiment” series, I’ll take a step back from the … Continue reading

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In the Footsteps of the 130th Pennsylvania at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville

The 130th Pennsylvania Infantry mustered in for a nine-month term, serving from August 1862 to May 1863. During this comparatively brief time, they fought in some of the war’s bloodiest battles. In a previous post, I followed in the footsteps … Continue reading

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In the Footsteps of the 130th Pennsylvania at Antietam

Mustered in mid-August 1862, the untested recruits of the 130th Pennsylvania Infantry barely had time to learn how to be soldiers before they were thrown into the chaotic battle of Antietam on September 17. There, they were heavily engaged in … Continue reading

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A.C.L. Gatewood, the Lost Cause, and Two Different Accounts of the Appomattox Campaign

Andrew Cameron Lewis Gatewood came from an influential family in Bath County, Virginia. Before the war, the wealth and status of his family helped secure him a position as a cadet at the Virginia Military Institute. He spent most of … Continue reading

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The Medical Department of Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg

Nestled away in the northwestern corner of the town, Gettysburg College is a small private liberal arts college (and my alma mater) with a long history. Prior to a name change in the early 1900s, the institution was known as … Continue reading

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David Laird and The Christian Commission at Gettysburg

My ongoing work about Camp Letterman General Hospital and the treatment of the wounded following the battle of Gettysburg tends not to be the most uplifting work. Though stories of resilience and healing are common, so too are stories of … Continue reading

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