Category Archives: Economics

Granger’s Juneteenth Orders and the Limiting of Freedom

Juneteenth is recognized as the symbolic end of slavery in the United States. Galveston, Texas, held out as a Confederate stronghold after Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. Once occupied by Union forces, Major General Gordon Granger established his headquarters … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Memory, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

BookChat with Leon Reed, author of No Greater Calamity for the Country

I was pleased to spend some time recently with No Greater Calamity for the Country: North-South Conflict, Secession, and the Onset of Civil War, a new release by Leon Reed from Little Falls Books. Leon was kind enough to take a … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Books & Authors, Economics, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

BookChat with Brian Luskey, Author of Men is Cheap

I was pleased to spend some time recently with a new book by historian Brian Luskey, associate professor of history at West Virginia University. Luskey is the author of Men Is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War … Continue reading

Posted in Books & Authors, Common Soldier, Economics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Book Review: “The Limits of Loyalty: Ordinary People in Civil War Mississippi”

Easy as it is to imagine the Confederacy made up of a solid group of Union-hating slave owners and their friends, the reality of the situation is much more complex. Jarrett Ruminski, a freelance writer, researcher, and consultant, investigates this … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Books & Authors, Economics, Memory, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The Homestead Act, Early Republicans, and the Coming of the Civil War

Nearly everyone knows that the Emancipation Proclamation became effective on January 1, 1863.  This document formally established abolition of slavery as one of the Union’s goals in fighting and winning the Civil War and enabled the North to recruit African … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Emerging Civil War, Lincoln, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 18 Comments

The Historic Harbors

A couple of weeks ago I attended a leadership retreat where a speaker touted the longtime importance of Hampton Roads as a harbor and host to very important events in American history. This got me thinking: what are the most … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Battlefields & Historic Places, Economics, Navies, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

East Tennessee and Confederate Copper

On November 25, 1863, Colonel Eli Long rode into Cleveland, Tennessee, at the head of 1,500 Union cavalrymen. They were there to wreak general havoc. When it comes to Civil War cavalry raids, Long’s Cleveland incursion does not garner much … Continue reading

Posted in Cavalry, Economics, Material Culture, Weapons, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

Women in History–EEEK!

What’s a girl/woman to do?? In honor of Women’s History Month, I thought I would editorialize for a few minutes here at ECW, the blog that gave me my break. Military History is not always a comfortable place for a … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Civilian, Common Soldier, Economics, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Second City

The Civil War defined America – that statement is heard often in many quarters. We use that phrase in ECW’s tagline. Many effects from that conflict are quite visible in today’s America, while others are not as apparent at first … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Ties to the War, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

“Little Photography in Jeffdom:” The Decline of Photography in the Civil War South

In 1862 Humphrey’s Journal of the Daguerreotype and Photographic Arts boasted that “The Photographic Art down South has completely died out in consequence of the war.”[i] Though an obvious overstatement, considering that southern photographers operated throughout the war, the journal … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civil War Events, Civilian, Common Soldier, Economics, Leadership--Confederate, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Newspapers, Personalities, Photography, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments