Category Archives: Economics

The Critical Role of Railroads in Influencing Military Strategy in the Civil War

ECW welcomes back guest author Lloyd W. Klein One of the lessons of the Civil War, General William T Sherman wrote in his memoirs, was that the value of railroads became  “… fully recognized in war quite as much as, … Continue reading

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Hurrah for Homespun!

Poetry and songs that came out of the Civil War, entertaining as they are, served as a useful vehicle for rhetoric that supported their respective sides. Songs like “Bonnie Blue Flag”, “Marching Through Georgia”, “Dixie”, and “Battle Cry of Freedom” … Continue reading

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The Economic Challenges of the Confederacy

ECW welcomes back Dr. Lloyd W. Klein Jefferson Davis brought to the Confederate Presidency long experience in the military and in politics, including service in the US Senate and the War Department.  Nevertheless, he was not a very good executive. … Continue reading

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US Government Financing of the Civil War

ECW welcomes guest author Dr. Lloyd W. Klein Faced with the problem of financing a major war, President Abraham Lincoln and his Treasury Secretary, Salmon P. Chase, found innovative solutions that remain foundational of the contemporary US economy. Some of … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part II

Emerging Civil War welcomes back guest contributor Adam Burke…[see Part I here] Slavery’s effects on Southern industry and manufacturing devastated the Confederacy’s military manpower capacity. The antebellum North enjoyed dramatic economic and population expansion. From 1840 to 1850, population growth … Continue reading

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The Paradox of the Lost Cause: Part I

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest contributor Adam Burke… Tucked into the nook of a large brick building in historic Harpers Ferry is a conspicuous granite monolith. It stands along Potomac Street, a lesser traveled street one block … Continue reading

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On The Eve Of War: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Before it was the Steel City, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania was known as the Gateway to the West. The hilly city perched above three swift rivers had a population of 50,000, making it then as now the second largest city in the … Continue reading

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On The Eve of War: Williamsburg, Virginia

In 1860 the former capital of Virginia still had many tangible remnants of its colonial past, and would become quickly swept up in the coming war. Williamsburg had 1,895 residents in 1860, with 864 black and 1,031 white. Of the … Continue reading

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The Secession of Mississippi

January 9, 2020, is the 160th anniversary of the secession of Mississippi Named for war hero Andrew Jackson, Jackson, Mississippi, was founded in 1821 at the intersection of the Natchez Trace and the Pearl River. Jackson himself had come through … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Antebellum South, Economics, Politics, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Maggie Walker and how she valued history

The Wall Street Journal recently ran an article about African American banker Maggie Walker and her impact on the banking industry. I’m always glad to see her get recognition for her hard work in banking and her leadership in civil … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Personalities, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment