Category Archives: Economics

“Guilty Party:” Bessie Sulers and Schuylkill Arsenal Outwork

In John Billings’ famous Hardtack and Coffee, he references the ritual that nearly every man in the various Federal armies participated in with the opening of the spring campaign: “At the first start from camp, many men would burden themselves … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Material Culture | 1 Comment

The First Peacetime Christmas–December 25, 1865

The war was over, and peace had come at last. But Christmas that year was marred by a tremendous gale which swept along the Atlantic coast on December 20, wrecking many ships and drowning some of the people who had … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Holidays, Lincoln, Memory, Personalities, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Traveling South during the first stages of Reconstruction

Shortly after the war, Francis Butler Leigh, traveling with her father, left the North to reclaim their plantation in the Sea Islands. Francis chronicled her journey through the South, as well as documented the transition of Southern society from the … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Memory, Reconstruction | 4 Comments

The Port Royal Experiment-Setting the Stage for Reconstruction, Part 4

Conclusion to the Port Royal Experiment series.   Despite the preparation, the enthusiasm, and the progress of the Gideonites based in Port Royal, South Carolina, the government had separate ideas for how Reconstruction should be structured. Educationally, the experiment was … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Economics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

What Did the War Cost?

For the last few weeks, I have been serving a detail to Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park as a park historian. After a walking tour of the Sunken Road on the Fredericksburg Battlefield, I received the following question: “What … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Aftermath In Atlanta

Atlanta, Georgia was a key Confederate railway hub throughout the war with a thriving population of about 22,000. Defense of this industrial city fell to Lt. General John Bell Hood and his army, which unfortunately was much too small for … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civilian, Economics, Sesquicentennial | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Strategy Afloat: Commerce Raiding

November 6 is an important date in the history of one of the Civil War’s most successful commerce raiders, the CSS Shenandoah. This day 150 years ago she took the second of her 38 victims; exactly a year later she … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Emerging Civil War, Navies, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Richmond Bread Riots, Conclusion

Today, we welcome back guest author, Ashley Webb. (part two of two) On April 1, several women met at Belvidere Hill Baptist Church in Oregon Hill, Richmond, to discuss their plans. Starting peacefully, the group planned to march through the … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Civilian, Economics, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Richmond Bread Riots, Part I

Today, we welcome back guest author Ashley Webb. By 1863, Richmond was a major railway hub, an industrial center of the South, and the burgeoning capital of the Confederacy. With the continuation of the Civil War, large influxes of soldiers … Continue reading

Posted in Arms & Armaments, Civil War Events, Civilian, Economics, Memory, Personalities, Politics | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Creamer, Please. No Sugar

I had an idea the other day, and acted on it! I sort of made a “coffee run,” if you will . . . ——- Starbucks Customer Service / PO Box 6363 / Dover, DE 19905-6363 Meg Thompson / Hollister, CA 95023 / July … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Economics, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Personalities, Preservation, Sesquicentennial, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments