Category Archives: Leadership–Federal

ECW Weekender: The Nation’s Christmas Tree

High in the California mountains, a towering tree – named for a Civil War general – is the nation’s Christmas Tree. Designated with the holiday title by President Calvin Coolidge in 1926, the Sequoia tree still stands and is visited … Continue reading

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Civil War Echoes: Pearl Harbor

Today 75 years ago the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, catapulting the United States into World War II – a conflict that turned out to be the country’s bloodiest save for the Civil War. Many of the U.S. ships in Pearl … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Leadership--Federal, Navies, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Meade’s Account of Mine Run

One of my favorite pieces of correspondence from the war is a Dec. 2, 2863, letter that George Gordon Meade wrote to his wife in the wake of the Mine Run campaign. The commander of the Army of the Potomac, … Continue reading

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Book Review: “Decision at Tom’s Brook: George Custer, Thomas Rosser and the Joy of the Fight”

In the autumn of 1864, Maj. Gen. Phillip Sheridan and Lt. Gen. Jubal Early engaged one another in an effort to control Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. A Union defeat might well have offset gains made by Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Book Review, Books & Authors, Campaigns, Cavalry, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Meade After Mine Run on Grant After Chattanooga

Just before the Army of the Potomac set out for what would be the Mine Run campaign in late November 1863, word reached the men of the Union victory at Chattanooga. Between Nov. 23-25, the Federal armies of the Tennessee and … Continue reading

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Civil War Echoes: Chennault and the Flying Tigers

One of the most famous flying units of World War II was the American Volunteer Group (AVG) under Claire Lee Chennault (pictured). Known as the “Flying Tigers,” the AVG fought in China and Southeast Asia for 7 months (20 December … Continue reading

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Grant, the Wilderness, and the Loneliness of Command

On the evening of May 6, 1864, Lieutenant General U.S. Grant considered the day’s events. The Battle of the Wilderness had just ended its second day, and Grant’s forces had been  beaten and battered in a way he’d never seen. … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Shenandoah Valley Campaigns and The Importance of Luck

Part One With the month of October behind us, I think back on the topic of my first co-publication, Bloody Autumn, the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864. To add impetus to the recollections this year, I am currently fine-tuning a presentation that I will … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Remembering Emory Upton

What is it that attracts us to particular individuals of the past? I think the answer varies from person to person. We all have people who we tend to gravitate towards in our studies. For readers of this blog, friends … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Leadership--Federal, Memory, Personalities | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Memorializing Emory Upton

Upton Road runs straight as a railroad track away from Route 33 into the Genesee County countryside of western New York. The nearby town of Batavia—nestled roughly midway between Buffalo and Rochester—hails itself as “The Birthplace of Western New York” … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Leadership--Federal, Personalities | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments