Category Archives: Lincoln

On Location: Charlotte, NC

One of the most oddball monuments I’ve ever seen is in Charlotte, North Carolina, embedded in the sidewalk. Last summer, I finally went On Location to seek it out: the spot where Jefferson Davis heard the news about Lincoln’s assassination. Check … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War Series, Lincoln, On Location | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Homestead Act, Early Republicans, and the Coming of the Civil War

Nearly everyone knows that the Emancipation Proclamation became effective on January 1, 1863.  This document formally established abolition of slavery as one of the Union’s goals in fighting and winning the Civil War and enabled the North to recruit African … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Emerging Civil War, Lincoln, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

Searching for George Brinton McClellan

In preparation for Rob Orrison’s and my upcoming ECWS book, To Hazard All: A Guide to the Maryland Campaign, 1862, we closed the books and hit the trails and cement roads zigzagging through northern Virginia and central and western Maryland. At … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War Series, Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Memory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

The Unexpected Turn

In my conclusion to Turning Points of the American Civil War, I suggest that Lincoln’s assassination was perhaps a turning point of the war rather than just a tragic coda that followed the surrender at Appomattox. In his outstanding book … Continue reading

Posted in Lincoln, Reconstruction, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

“Thenceforward and Forever Free”: The Emancipation Proclamation as a Turning Point

We are pleased to welcome Dan Vermilya, author of the upcoming Emerging Civil war Series book That Field of Blood: The Battle of Antietam. Dan, a historian at Gettysburg National Military Park, is also a licensed battlefield guide at Antietam … Continue reading

Posted in Engaging the Civil War Series, Lincoln, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

The Union’s Great Crisis: The Fall of ’62

Most of our “turning points” have focused on a single event, but if we widen the lens and look at the broader pendulum swings of the Civil War, certainly fewer periods of the conflict had more at stake than the … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Emerging Civil War Digital Shorts, Lincoln, Politics | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Lincoln’s Yard Sale

Into the grind of sourcing a book some sun must shine once in a while. As I rechecked an endnote from Harold Holzer’s Lincoln, President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861, I also checked those little sticky tabs … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Lincoln | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Civil War Cookin’: It’s Just A Book Review

Well, it’s a couple days after Thanksgiving and since we’ve already “decked the halls with boughs of holly” (at least at my home), it’s probably time to wrap up Civil War Cookin‘ for 2017. If you’ve been intrigued by the … Continue reading

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ECW Weekender: Remembrance Day at Gettysburg

There is always a lot to see and do when visiting the battlefield and town of Gettysburg. Most visitors head to the well-known and oft visited locations of Little Round Top, Cemetery Ridge, and the fields of Pickett’s Charge. Some … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Civilian, Common Soldier, ECW Weekender, Holidays, Leadership--Federal, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Monuments, National Park Service | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Question of the Week: 11/13-11/19/17

On November 19, 1863, President Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address. Although some weren’t impressed in 1863, the speech is now cherished by many folks and considered one of the most famous addresses in U.S. History. Why is the Gettysburg Address … Continue reading

Posted in Lincoln, Memory, Question of the Week | Tagged , | 5 Comments