Category Archives: Slavery

Jerilyn James Lee and Why the Civil War Still Matters

A pretty lady walked quietly in the cemetery where her grandparents and great-grandparents are buried. As she looked at the dates on the markers: I realized from the dates on my great grandmother’s grave that she was born in 1859 … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Civil War Events, Common Soldier, Internet, Websites & Blogs, National Park Service, Preservation, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Now In Theaters: “Harriet”

When I was a kid, I didn’t want super-heroes. I wanted real-heroes (and heroines). My brothers can vouch for this. We spent an afternoon faulting Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, and the rest, and naming historical people to a list of … Continue reading

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And Then What Happened?: Abraham After 1863 (pt.4)

Wait just a moment! A letter from P. T. Barnum? Really? And no discussion? Have no fear. Two topics need to be looked at in depth before the subject of Abraham is exhausted, and one of them is Barnum’s letter. … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments

Abraham’s Fifteen Minutes of Fame (pt. 3)

Enslaved Abraham became Free Abraham in a matter of seconds. His body arched over the line from the Confederate 3rd Louisiana Redan to the Union 81st Illinois Volunteer Infantry. As the men in blue helped him to his feet, it … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Civilian, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Federal, Medical, Newspapers, Personalities, Sieges, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Just Who Was Abraham? (pt. 2)

Before the war, there was an enslaved man called Abraham. His last name was unknown. Here is what is known: The black man known as Abraham was between 18-25 years old at the time of the Siege of Vicksburg. He … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Leadership--Federal, Newspapers, Personalities, Slavery, Trans-Mississippi | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

John Brown’s Raid 160th: Conclusion

We’re wrapping up the official series for the 160th of John Brown’s Raid. You’ll probably see a couple more posts in the coming weeks so stay turned! Here’s a review of all the posts in the series.

Posted in Antebellum South, Slavery | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

A Little Justice Here, Folks! (pt. 1)

On February 6 of this year, I wrote a blog post about Abraham, a formerly enslaved person who was “blown to freedom” at Vicksburg. I found something very compelling about this man. He is young, seems to be relatively healthy, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Civilian, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Personalities, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

Angel or Elf: Bronson Alcott and the Secret Six Plot to Assist John Brown

“Surely dear father, some good angel or elf dropped a talisman in your cradle that gave you force to walk thro life in quaint sunshine while others groped in the dark… “ –Louisa May Alcott to her father November 28, … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Memory, Personalities, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 12 Comments

ECW Weekender: Newby’s Crossroads

It is well-known where and how Dangerfield Newby’s life ended. But it is less known where his life began. In the countryside of Rappahannock County, Virginia, Dangerfield Newby was born to a white father and enslaved mother around 1820. The … Continue reading

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Arming Virginia: Henry Wise’s Attempts to Prevent Another John Brown’s Raid

The word of John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry struck the Governor’s Mansion in Richmond, Virginia like a thunderbolt. Immediately, the lanky Henry Wise sprang into action. He called on the state’s militia to help suppress the uprising before journeying … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Civilian, Personalities, Politics, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments