Category Archives: Slavery

Book Review – Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

ECW welcomes back guest author Nathan Varnold. Understanding the life of the most famous and most outspoken black abolitionist in American history is no easy task, but David W. Blight has spent most of his career attempting to simplify a … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Personalities, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Significance of June 19 in the Civil War Era—and Beyond

Amidst seemingly constant reminders that genuine equality for all in the United States remains elusive, it is worth remembering that today, June 19, has repeatedly been a momentous one for the cause of American freedom—particularly with regard to race.  While … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Saving History Saturday: Fredericksburg, Virginia to Move Slave Auction Block

On Tuesday, June 11, the Fredericksburg City Council voted 6 to 1 to remove and relocate the city’s well-known slave auction block. Located at the corner of William and Charles Streets in downtown Fredericksburg, the block has been the source … Continue reading

Posted in Preservation, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

On This Day: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Did you know…? On June 5, 1851, the first installation of Uncle Tom’s Cabin appeared in The National Era – an abolitionist paper. The story would run for forty installation, and in 1852, it was published in book form. Harriet … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Material Culture, Slavery | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

What Was So Wrong with Slavery?

“What was so wrong with slavery and why did it cause the Civil War?” This question was asked of a seasonal park ranger at the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center a few years ago. This question was asked by a white … Continue reading

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Emerging Scholar Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders

As part of our partnership with the American Civil War Museum in Richmond and Civil War Monitor, we’re pleased to introduce the next of our “Emerging Scholars,” Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders. Ashleigh will be presenting her work at the museum’s Grand Opening May 4. While current … Continue reading

Posted in Memory, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Alexander Stephen and the Cornerstone Speech

On March 21, 1861—one hundred and fifty-eight years ago today—Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens was in Savannah, in his home state of Georgia. Seven states had already declared themselves seceded from the Union, and Stephens addressed a large crowd to … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Slavery | Tagged , , , , | 46 Comments

Hiram Revels and Blanche Bruce: America’s First Black Senators

On February 25, 1870, visitors in the U.S. Senate gallery burst into applause when the new Republican senator from Mississippi entered the chamber. This man was no ordinary senator. He was Hiram R. Revels, and he was the first African … Continue reading

Posted in Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

“Powerful and Determined”: Susie King Taylor and Her Image as Seen by Stephen Restelli

I could not tell she was African-American in looking at the negative.  When I  scanned it as viewed her as a positive print, chills went through me.  This was the most stunning portrait photograph I have ever seen.  And I … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Photography, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Susie King Taylor: The First African American Army Nurse

“I was born under the slave law in Georgia, in 1848, and was brought up by my grandmother in Savannah.” So begin the memoirs of Civil War nurse Susie King Taylor, a most unusual woman in many ways. She was … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Medical, Slavery, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments