Category Archives: Slavery

The Resonance of The Field of Blood

I recently finished reading The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War by Joanne B. Freeman, and in all honesty, I can’t remember a history book that seemed more relevant or resonant. Published in 2018, … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Book Review, Books & Authors, Politics, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Granger’s Juneteenth Orders and the Limiting of Freedom

Juneteenth is recognized as the symbolic end of slavery in the United States. Galveston, Texas, held out as a Confederate stronghold after Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. Once occupied by Union forces, Major General Gordon Granger established his headquarters … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Memory, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Reconstruction, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

ECW Weekender: Juneteenth – Celebrating Freedom

Posting this weekender earlier than usual so there’s time to register and attend the free virtual tour today about the Civil War and Emancipation at Montpelier! Details and registration below. June 19, 1865. It had been over two years since … Continue reading

Posted in ECW Weekender, Internet, Websites & Blogs, Slavery, Upcoming Events | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Aunt Jemima and the Lost Cause

Quaker Oats has just announced they will retire the Aunt Jemima brand name and imagery. The ready-made, self-rising pancake mix got its start in 1889 at the Pearl Milling Company in St. Joseph, Missouri. The initial owners soon went bankrupt … Continue reading

Posted in Antebellum South, Memory, Personalities, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

Monuments, Mass Demonstrations, Race, and Reconstruction

(Editor’s Note: The conversations we’ve had on the blog this week about monuments, the recent mass demonstrations, and race have caused some readers to ask, “How does this help us better understand the Civil War?” In fact, the mission of … Continue reading

Posted in Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War, USCT | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 35 Comments

History and Healing: Removing Controversial Artifacts from the Civic Landscape

(Editor’s Note: For more context on monuments, see our 2017 series “A Monumental Discussion“) Most Civil War buffs by now have probably heard the news that Virginia Governor Ralph Northam announced on Thursday the planned removal of the Robert E. … Continue reading

Posted in Emerging Civil War, Memory, Monuments, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 51 Comments

“To destroy this kind of theology”: Federals in the Fox House

On May 24, 1864, after Winfield Scott Hancock’s II Corps had crossed the North Anna River and then avoided a Confederate trap, Hancock’s men threw up lines of works to protect themselves. One of the lines near the front “took … Continue reading

Posted in Civilian, Primary Sources, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Yes, I Picked Benjamin Butler for My Fantasy Draft

ECW welcomes guest author Bryan Cheeseboro. Recently, I enjoyed “The Civil War Fantasy Draft” presented by The American Battlefield Trust on their Facebook page as part of their new Zoom Goes the History video series.  As we are under social … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Confederate “Slave Hunt” and the Gettysburg Campaign

ECW welcomes guest author Cooper Wingert Civil War historians are apt to recite one well-known fact about the battle of Gettysburg—that despite the immense carnage which blanketed the fields outside of the small Pennsylvania borough, the Civil War’s bloodiest battle … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigns, Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Richmond Rising: African Americans and the Mobilization of the Confederate Capital

ECW welcomes guest author Cameron Sauers The idealistic fervor of young soldier boys marching off to war is contagious even for modern readers who cannot help but find something gallant in April 1861. But lurking beneath the surface of romantic … Continue reading

Posted in Slavery | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments