Category Archives: Ties to the War

The Great Naval Leaders

On May 10 I lectured about the Battle of Midway to Old Dominion University’s Institute of Learning in Retirement. Over the course of a wonderful discussion, I assessed one of the U.S. commanders, Raymond Spruance, as “one of the greatest … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Navies, Personalities, Ties to the War, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

God Save the Union? U.S. Civil War Pensions for Her Majesty’s Subjects, 1883

One of the military history groups I belong to on LinkedIn posted this link this week, showing details about British/United Kingdom deaths in the Civil War and widows who were receiving U.S. pensions in 1883. There were far more of … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Question of the Week: 4/24/-4/30/17

In April 1917, the United States officially entered World War I. What Civil War era tactics, innovations, and ideas were used during World War I – successfully or unsuccessfully?

Posted in Armies, Question of the Week, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

General Chennault Finds Inspiration

Earlier, I blogged about the Civil War ties to Claire Lee Chennault and the Flying Tigers. On 4 July 1942, the Flying Tigers ceased to exist, and the men became the cadre for the China Air Task Force, part of … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Cavalry, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Turkish Grant

Emerging Civil War welcomes back Frank Jastrzembski In May 1897, the eminent Major General Nelson A. Miles departed from the United States to observe the Greek and Ottoman armies at war. The 57-year-old Miles was almost boyish in his enthusiasm … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Personalities, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Civil War Echoes: The Fall of Bataan

Today 75 years ago, Major General Edward P. King surrendered 76,000 American and Filipino troops on the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines. This is far and away the largest capitulation in American military history. Bataan’s fall is also rife with … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Confederate, Material Culture, Personalities, Sieges, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Harper’s Weekly World News

I don’t know about you, but I am tired of all the outrage these days about “fake news.” People who use that term have no idea what they’re talking about. Anyone who ever used to read the old Weekly World … Continue reading

Posted in Holidays, Ties to the War | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Women in History–EEEK!

What’s a girl/woman to do?? In honor of Women’s History Month, I thought I would editorialize for a few minutes here at ECW, the blog that gave me my break. Military History is not always a comfortable place for a … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Civilian, Common Soldier, Economics, Lincoln, Material Culture, Memory, Politics, Reconstruction, Slavery, Ties to the War | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Seward’s Folly at 150

150 years ago yesterday, the United States concluded the treaty transferring Alaska from Russia to the United States. On April 9 (the second anniversary of Appomattox), the Senate ratified the deal.

Posted in Leadership--Federal, Politics, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

Pontoon Bridges: The Great Crossings

Yesterday Sarah Kay Bierle looked at the ancient uses of pontoon bridges and its perspectives on the 1862 Battle of Fredericksburg. While she addressed the difficulties of bridging rivers, I would like to look at the other side of the coin: … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Arms & Armaments, Campaigns, Ties to the War, Weapons | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments