Category Archives: Western Theater

The fall of Vicksburg: Breaking the Backbone of the Rebellion

On July 4, 1863, Major General U.S. Grant’s army captured Vicksburg, Mississippi.  This campaign often gets hastily passed over in history conversations.  Gettysburg and Fourth festivities take precedent.  I’m at fault for neglecting this event as well.  Still, the fall … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Forged in Fire – The Battle of Athens, Missouri, Part II

For Part I of this Series, click here.  In August 1861, Athens, Missouri was a bustling river town in the extreme northeastern corner of the state, perched just across the Des Moines River from the Iowa border. With over 500 … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Emerging Civil War, Regiments, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Forged in Fire – The Battle of Athens, Missouri, Part I

By the early summer of 1861, Missourians across the state plunged into war in response to the Camp Jackson Affair and its polarizing aftermath. Devoted Unionists were called to arms by Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon to join the Home Guards … Continue reading

Posted in Battles, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

The Bullard Boys – Tragedy For A Mississippi Family

A closer examination of a single family during the war can sometimes reveal much about the universal struggles and hardships of the average soldier and civilian. One family was the recipient of a letter written by one new volunteer of … Continue reading

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“The prison over the Pearl River at Jackson, Mississippi, where Union prisoners have been confined.”

In researching my forthcoming book on the battle of Jackson, Mississippi—which took place on this date in 1863 as part of Grant’s campaign through Mississippi to take Vicksburg—I stumbled on a little bit of a mystery, although I didn’t know … Continue reading

Posted in Common Soldier, Newspapers, Primary Sources, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

A Tale of Three Hammets

On May 14, 1864, just north of the Green family cabin, twenty-four-year-old Robert C. Hammet fell dead with a bullet in his brain. His regiment, the 54th Virginia, was ordered into a reckless, suicidal charge against a line of Federal … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Civilian, Common Soldier, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Regiments, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

The (Limited) Destruction of Atlanta

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome W. Todd Groce, Ph.D., president and C.E.O. of the Georgia Historical Society, based in Savannah. Todd was kind enough to share with us a little treasure from the GHS’s incredible collection. This morning … Continue reading

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Morgan’s Magnificent March from Cumberland Gap

From his perch behind miles of stout defenses in Cumberland Gap, Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan could look daily into his enemy’s camp in front of him. Strangely though, Morgan had more to worry about beyond the enemy in front … Continue reading

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Kentucky’s Governor Fought and Fell at Shiloh

On February 8, 1862, Confederate generals Albert Sidney Johnston, P.G.T. Beauregard, and William Hardee conferred on the most recent turn of events in the Western Theater at Beauregard’s Bowling Green, Kentucky, headquarters. Fort Henry fell to Union forces two days … Continue reading

Posted in 160th Anniversary, Battles, Personalities, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Supposed Enigma of Isidore Francois Turgis

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin was not just a hit in America, but also in France. After its publication slavery was considered a blight on history, at least in France’s liberal circles. Among those affected was Isidore Francois Turgis, … Continue reading

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