Category Archives: Western Theater

Among the Casualties of Shiloh at Jefferson Barracks

As the largest burial ground of Civil War soldiers in the state of Missouri, Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery (just minutes south of St. Louis) is the final resting place of approximately 16,000 Union and Confederate soldiers. Forever under the sod … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Emerging Civil War, Memory, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Ending the War, More or Less

April 9, 1865, is the day that most people think the American Civil War came to an end. General Robert E. Lee realized his gallant Army of Northern Virginia was simply too beaten up to continue its fight for Confederate … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War Events, Emerging Civil War, Leadership--Confederate, Leadership--Federal, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

David Reed: Shiloh’s Veteran Historian

Gettysburg has John Bachelder. Antietam has Ezra Carman. Shiloh has David Reed. Each of these men forever influenced the battlefields they devoted their lives to documenting. Two of them–Carman and Reed–participated in the battles they studied. I’ll admit, Carman and … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Memory, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

John S. Bowen’s Brigade and the First Day at Shiloh

In the early afternoon of April 6, 1862, General Albert Sidney Johnston raised the tin cup he had grabbed from a Union camp earlier that day and tapped the line of bayonets of his Rebel troops to rally them forward. … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefields & Historic Places, Battles, Emerging Civil War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

The Buckner Graves

Last June I visited the graves of Simon Bolivar Buckner Sr and Jr, who are buried with their wives in the Frankfort Cemetery in Kentucky. I blogged about both men before here.

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Book Review: Caught in the Maelstrom: The Indian Nations in the Civil War, 1861-1865

Once in a while, someone will comment on just how there can be so many books about one topic–the American Civil War. There is a definable reason for this phenomenon: fighting the Civil War was a job undertaken by many, … Continue reading

Posted in Book Review, Trans-Mississippi, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

CW & Pop Culture: Civil War Rock and Roll, or, Who was Larkin Poe?

When it comes to the Civil War and popular culture, I admit I am hard to please. For example, with a couple of notable exceptions, I am generally disappointed by film portrayals of the American Civil War. Even the ones … Continue reading

Posted in Civil War in Pop Culture, Ties to the War, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Question of the Week: 9/9-9/15/19

In your opinion…in the western theater, what was the most Confederate raid into Northern states or territories? Why?

Posted in Campaigns, Question of the Week, Western Theater | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

The Fall of Fort Henry and the Changing of Confederate Strategy

Fort Donelson has “Unconditional Surrender” Grant. It has an early morning Confederate attack, a breakout by Nathan Bedford Forrest and, in short, the stuff that makes good history. But from this outsider’s perspective looking in on the Western Theater, I … Continue reading

Posted in Armies, Battles, Campaigns, Leadership--Confederate, Navies, Politics, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Rock Star Egos and the Army of Tennessee’s Most Important Inferiority Complex

I’ve been listening this week to the audiobook version of Greg Mertz’s Attack at Daylight and Whip Them: The Battle of Shiloh (one of my jobs, as series editor, is to listen to and approve all the books before they’re … Continue reading

Posted in Leadership--Confederate, Personalities, Western Theater | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments