Showing results for "North Anna"

What If…George Thomas Had Marched Through Snake Creek Gap?

On May 7, 1864, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman set his three armies marching. At the time, they were stretched on a long front, from Red Clay on the Georgia-Tennessee line to Lee’s and Gordon’s Mills, more than a dozen miles to the southwest. Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield’s Army of the Ohio held the […]

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The fall of Vicksburg: Breaking the Backbone of the Rebellion

On July 4, 1863, Major General U.S. Grant’s army captured Vicksburg, Mississippi.  This campaign often gets hastily passed over in history conversations.  Gettysburg and Fourth festivities take precedent.  I’m at fault for neglecting this event as well.  Still, the fall of this small, quiet town played a pivotal role in the destruction of the Confederacy […]

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“New Orleans gone and with it the Confederacy” – The Fall of New Orleans

ECW welcomes back guest author Patrick Kelly-Fischer The signposts of my mental outline of the Civil War have always been major land battles – Shiloh, Antietam, Gettysburg, Vicksburg. The histories we grew up on are framed around these titanic battles. They’re the most popular battlefields to visit, and it would be intuitive that the most important […]

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Exchanging a Saber for a Cane: The Case of Colonel Charles Augustus May

In 1861, over 250 U.S. Army officers resigned their commissions. The majority joined the rebellion, while a few remained loyal to the Union. Nineteen officers (seven percent) didn’t serve on either side. The choice was not so simple for these officers. Some were loyal to the Union but would not take up arms against friends […]

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The Louisiana Unification Movement and the Political Limits of Reconstruction

In the messy annals of Reconstruction, one of the most perplexing episodes was the short-lived but fascinating Unification Movement of Louisiana. A New Orleans political alliance of both black and white elites, the movement tried to merge concerns over corruption and high taxes with a racially progressive agenda. The movement was biracial and elite in […]

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McIlvaine’s Hotel: A Landmark on the Road to Gettysburg

For those who over the years have traveled to Gettysburg with some regularity, I’m sure that each of us have some landmarks that once passed let us know we really are on the way to Gettysburg. For myself, there’s still a sense of anticipation each time I take the Breezewood exit off the Pennsylvania Turnpike. […]

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The Wet March: USS Monitor Almost Sinks

If by “on the march,” we mean the exercise of rapidly shifting a combat unit from behind the lines to where the action is while overcoming formidable obstacles of terrain and weather, then the U.S. Navy had its own wet marches.

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On The March Through Some Civil War Lyrics

A quick survey of the music and lyrics in Irwin Silber’s book Songs of the Civil War reveals some interesting details about “marching” in Civil War culture. The following notes are not intended to be a comprehensive study, but rather a reflection of the attitudes and sentiments around marching as reflected in the lyrics of […]

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On the March to Sailor’s Creek with Tucker’s Naval Battalion

One thousand Confederate sailors and Marines defended Richmond by April 1865. Rear Admiral Raphael Semmes commanded the James River Squadron’s ironclads, wooden steamers, and torpedo boats. The Confederate Naval Academy, officers in training, operated CSS Patrick Henry. Captain John R. Tucker commanded land batteries guarding the James River at Drewry’s Bluff. A scattering of sailors […]

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