Showing results for "North Anna"

Prelude to A Star: Promotion in Frederick City

Conclusion of a series. The city of Frederick, Maryland  greeted George Custer for the second time in less than a year. Custer had passed through the previous September during the Antietam Campaign while serving as an aide-de-camp to the commander of the Army of the Potomac, George McClellan. Now, on June 27, 1863 he had […]

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Eastern Theater versus Western Theater: Where the Civil War Was Won and Lost: Part Five

Part five in a series. This series was put together from one of my extended graduate school research papers. The sources used were the current research between 2007-2008, obviously the historiography of the Civil War expands on a monthly basis, thus some of the “current research” in the paper is no longer exactly current. ************** […]

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Stonewall’s great-great granddaughter

One of the great benefits of this job is the opportunity to travel around and talk to different Civil War Roundtables. On Wednesday of this week, I spent an evening in Manhattan with the Civil War Forum of Metropolitan New York about Ulysses S. Grant’s memoirs. On the Saturday prior, I spent time in Burlington, […]

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Eastern Theater versus Western Theater: Where the Civil War Was Won and Lost: Part Three

Part three in a series. This series was put together from one of my extended graduate school research papers. The sources used were the current research between 2007-2008, obviously the historiography of the Civil War expands on a monthly basis, thus some of the “current research” in the paper is no longer exactly current. ************ […]

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CVBT preserves the site where Jackson’s arm was amputated

From our friends at the Central Virginia Battlefields Trust comes word that they’ve preserved another important track associated with the battle of Chancellorsville: the site of the Wilderness field hospital where surgeons removed Stonewall Jackson’s arm following Jackson’s accidental wounding during the battle on May 2, 1863. Here are the details, straight from CVBT:

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Pick #2 on My Top Ten List–Reveille In Washington 1860-1865, by Margaret Leech

Part of a Series: Books Every Civil War Buff Ought to Own Pick number two in my Top 10 List: Reveille In Washington 1860-1865. Many books about the Civil War have been written, and many are good, but one that I think belongs on every bookshelf is Margaret Leech’s Pulitzer Prize winner, Reveille In Washington […]

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A visit with “Old Kinderhook” on the 150th anniversary of his death

The secession of South Carolina triggered civil war in Martin Van Buren’s house before it ever triggered fighting on the battlefield. After his public career ended, the former president had retired to the quiet life of a country farmer in his hometown of Kinderhook, just south of Albany, NY. His household included his son, Abraham, […]

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Disease: A Tale of Two Regiments (Part 1)

We are happy to welcome back guest author Jim Sundman On October 1, 1862, Corporal Joseph Couse of the 107th New York regiment died of “brain fever” while his unit was encamped on Maryland Heights across the Potomac River from Harpers Ferry.  A farmer from the small town of Hector in upstate New York, Couse […]

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The Mystery of Richard Garnett’s Sword

On July 3,1863, George Pickett’s famous Virginian division stepped out from the woods of Seminary Ridge to begin the charge that would go down in the annals of history bearing their commander’s name. It was mid-afternoon and the Battle of Gettysburg was quickly reaching its climax. Much has been written about this fateful charge. However, […]

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