Tag Archives: Abraham Lincoln

1860’s Politics: A Conclusion

It’s been a history-making month in modern America with the 2016 Presidential Election, and I think we managed to have some educational fun here on Emerging Civil War with our examination of 1860’s Politics. It’s time to close this political … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Songs For The Campaign Trail

During the past few weeks, we’ve noted some similarities between political campaigns in the 1860’s and the modern era. We’ve learned that mudslinging and “creative insults” aren’t new. We’ve reminded ourselves that Americans are opinionated. There’s one aspect of 1860’s politics … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Why Do We think McClellan Was the “Peace Candidate”? Because the Rebels Thought So

A thoughtful respondent to my recent submission to the ECW blog, “1860’s Politics,” wondered why Gen. George McClellan, Democratic nominee for U. S. president in 1864, waited until after Sherman’s troops captured Atlanta, Sept. 2, 1864, before he announced his … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Lincoln-Douglas Debates Continue, Part III: Self-Government and Political Correctness

If we define political correctness as demanding conformance with favored positions, not tolerating contrary opinions, and branding opponents or perceived opponents as radicals (“they are just evil/crazy/stupid”), all without offering rational counter arguments, then these are not new phenomena. Abraham … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: After All These Years, Why Do We Think President McClellan Would Have Given the Rebels an Armistice?

Approaching the 1864 Northern presidential election, students of the Atlanta Campaign tend to focus on how Sherman’s capture of the city on Sept. 2, 1864 helped President Lincoln win re-election. Conversely, we ponder Southerners’ hopes that the Democratic candidate, Maj. … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Common Ground? (2nd Edition)

This is a 2nd Edition article. When it was first published, blog readers noticed some historical errors. I removed the pieced, fixed the errors, and now share it again. My sincere apologies for the original mistakes. (Sarah Kay Bierle) In … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: Lincoln-Douglas Debates Continue, Part II: Supreme Court and Choice

Politics and the Supreme Court are much in the news today, as they were in 1858 when Abraham Lincoln debated Stephen Douglas for the U.S. Senate seat from Illinois. Issues have changed but more recent court decisions demonstrate that underlying … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: The Challenges of 1862

Obviously, there wasn’t a presidential election in 1862, but races for the seats in the U.S. Congress were very important. Who would gain control of the legislative branch? How would the outcome of the congressional elections effect the Union war … Continue reading

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1860’s Politics: The Ohio Election that “Saved the Union”

Emerging Civil War is pleased to welcome guest author David T. Dixon The current presidential contest reminds us that politics is indeed a blood sport. Those expressing regret that negative campaign ads and nasty election rhetoric are unfortunate indicators of … Continue reading

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1860 Politics – Lincoln-Douglas Debates Continue: Moral Consensus and Thin Democracy

The Lincoln-Douglas debates for the U.S. Senate seat from Illinois were in many ways unlike presidential debates we see on television today, but fundamental themes underlying them demonstrate historical continuity. One of those themes is consensus concerning foundational moral principles, … Continue reading

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